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Capcom Exec: Tokens Will Replace Discs In Five Years

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
News
Tags:
Capcom, Retail

Capcom Exec: Tokens Will Replace Discs In Five Years

"Retail Will Always Have A Place In Our Future"

Analysts, developers, hacks and gamers are currently debating the shape of our gaming future, which would appear to be predominantly digital. Capcom concurs, but suggests that there'll always be a place for traditional retail, with redeemable tokens for downloadable games replacing discs within the next five years.

Speaking to Gamasutra, Capcom's senior vice president of strategic business development (yikes) Christian Svensson reckons that traditional games retail won't die out as we enter the next console generation, but instead of discs, shops will likely stock downloadable content tokens bundled with a toy or plushie.

Retail will always have a place in our future. But five years down the road, the value proposition of retail, to publishers, will change. Retail's role will shift from planned purchase to impulse purchase, predominantly. And planned purchases will increasingly happen online, just for sheer convenience's sake.

Five years from now, more likely than not, we'll not have plastic discs in a box, but we'll have tokens in a box, something that is gift-able and able to be bundled with other hard items like figurines or plushes - or something else that has tangible value that can't be downloaded over a wire.

However, Svensson is also certain that the fully-digital future is "going to happen" sooner or later.

Very obviously, certainly sometime before five years from now, every game will be digital and retail. To quote my friend Paul Raines, the CEO of GameStop, they don't disagree on the inevitability of it, they disagree on the timing of it - when it's going to happen.

I definitely think that's going to happen very, very quickly. It's going to depend a lot on what the first party [console manufacturers] do in the next generation of console hardware.

With GAME's current woes firmly in mind, it's nice to hear that publishing execs still support high street retail.

Add a comment6 comments
gunnx  Mar. 15, 2012 at 11:21

so perhaps the special/collectors editions in retail with a download voucher inside, so you can get postcards, figurines, soundtracks etc

phil16  Mar. 15, 2012 at 12:23

Meh - I buy 90% of my PC games online already (steam/origin). Also I've zero interest in the existing special editions (for PC or xbox) with pointless toys/extras so I guess that means retail will be dead to me come the next gen consoles...

DivideByZero  Mar. 15, 2012 at 13:07

That works for PC as I would say Steam and Origin etc. work really quite well. Unfortunately the PSN (SEN) is slow as hell.

If digital delivery is going to be the future - and it may well be, then Sony need to up their game.

MyDogFarted  Mar. 15, 2012 at 13:35

When this eventually happens, I think that pricing will need to reflect the fact that customers will no longer have any means of getting some money back once they finish a game. I would imagine that a lot of people only currently buy on release days as they know that they can get money back on a trade in deal.

Demand will ultimately set prices, I just think that a lot of people will stay away from games that cost upward of a certain amount.

For me it would probably mean that I will start playing older games. I never play online so I won't be losing anything by waiting a few years for the price to come down

Last edited by MyDogFarted, Mar. 15, 2012 at 13:35
gunnx  Mar. 15, 2012 at 15:48

When this eventually happens, I think that pricing will need to reflect the fact that customers will no longer have any means of getting some money back once they finish a game. I would imagine that a lot of people only currently buy on release days as they know that they can get money back on a trade in deal.

Demand will ultimately set prices, I just think that a lot of people will stay away from games that cost upward of a certain amount.

For me it would probably mean that I will start playing older games. I never play online so I won't be losing anything by waiting a few years for the price to come down


not sure anyone knows what would happen, but if digital was the only medium and as long as you can buy from multiple sources prices should still be competitive. my main issue would be if 1st party titles were sold only by the 1st party.

Late  Mar. 15, 2012 at 16:05

I'm in agreement with MDF. If, as sounds increasingly likely, we're heading toward games that can't be resold, I don't anticipate paying more than £30 for anything. I regularly buy cheap second hand games and occasionally buy full price new games with the express intent of quickly completing them then selling them on. Means I can get through a relatively high number of games on a low budget. If that option goes then I'm unlikely to buy many new AAA titles.

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