Login | Signup

CD Projekt State There Is No Future For DRM

Author:
Carl Phillips
Category:
News
Tags:
CD Projekt, Diablo III, DRM, GOG.com, Guillaume Rambourg, Piracy

CD Projekt State There Is No Future For DRM

Decision To Not Use It "A Real No-Brainer"

In the aftermath of Diablo III’s troublesome launch, CD Projekt have once again come out taking the fight to DRM in games, simply stating that their online store GOG.com will never use DRM because “the truth is it does not work.”

In an interview with Forbes, Managing Director Guillaume Rambourg explained his reasoning as to why DRM does not succed in stopping pirated software from emerging online, as well as sharing his thoughts to the revelation that The Witcher 2 was generally ignored.

“I have to admit it was a big surprise. We were expecting to see the GOG.com version pirated right after it was released, as it was a real no-brainer. Practically anyone could have downloaded it from GOG.com (and we offered a pre-download option) and released it on the illegal sites right away, but this did not happen. My guess is, that releasing an unprotected game is not the real deal, you have to crack it to gain respect and be able to write, “cracked by XYZ.” How would “not cracked by XYZ, as there was nothing to crack” sound? A bit silly, wouldn’t it? The illegal scene is pretty much about the game and the glory: who will be the first to deliver the game, who is the best and smartest cracker. The DRM-free version at GOG.com didn’t fit this too well.”

Rambourg went on to suggest that DRM in general slows games down, suggesting that illegal copies are usually provide “a clean–and way more functional!–game.” He also took the opportunity to clarify that the Download Assistant for GOG.com does nothing more than guide users to their purchases on the site, and was in no way a form or DRM. You can read the interview in its entirety here.

We know many of you here have been affected by the Diablo III launch, and while you can hear us discussing the situation on the latest episode of the PWNcast, be on the lookout for further musings on the topic in the near future.

Add a comment5 comments
imdurc  May. 21, 2012 at 17:52

As much as I keep seeing CD Projekt talking about the same thing over and over, I find it relevant each time. I think it's also clear that DRM very rarely keeps a game out of a pirate's hands. I also find the argument that a DRM game gives "cred" to the person who cracks it an interesting one. Quite smart, really.

And with talk of Diablo 3's DRM (server based content) being worked on by the pirates, when will companies learn to be kinder to their paying customer?

DivideByZero  May. 21, 2012 at 18:13

DRM has ruined many a good game, that's for sure.

socialjeebus  May. 21, 2012 at 18:16

Ultimately DRM deters genuine consumers whilst not doing anything to deter pirates.

Take EA's stance on the new Sim City game, requiring a permanent internet connection to play.

I've always bought (usually on release day) Sim City games (the abomination that was Societies aside!). But I will be holding back on the next one until a crack is released enabling me to play offline (as I believe I should be able to). It's particularly important to me as I travel between Korea and Europe for work, believe me 10 hour plus flights do not seem quite as dull playing games on my laptop.

Last edited by socialjeebus, May. 21, 2012 at 18:16
Korma  May. 21, 2012 at 19:59

It's particularly important to me as I travel between Korea and Europe for work, believe me 10 hour plus flights do not seem quite as dull playing games on my laptop.


Playing Sim City while looking out the plane window over real cities must be awesome.

socialjeebus  May. 22, 2012 at 04:56

It's particularly important to me as I travel between Korea and Europe for work, believe me 10 hour plus flights do not seem quite as dull playing games on my laptop.


Playing Sim City while looking out the plane window over real cities must be awesome.


Lol, you can learn a few lessons or take some inspiration from some places! The thing is I'm not a massive fan of steam but I can at least use it offline, I can even even understand the whole "global" community thing for the new Sim City meaning you need to be online for that but to force people into a multiplayer game they may not be interested in simply as an excuse to burden a customer with more unwanted DRM is unforgivable.

FM 2012 is a flight killer too but I must confess I've drawn a fair few looks from other passengers celebrating last minute winners or cursing terrible finishing. So I try to stick too somewhat calmer games (Civ 5, etc).

Email Address:

You don't need an account to comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.