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Unrest Review | I Predict A Riot

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Indie Games, PC games, Pyrodactyl Games, RPGs, Unrest

Unrest Review | I Predict A Riot

Unrest is a game all about talking to people. There's little by way of direct violence in this indie RPG adventure title from Pyrodactyl Games, instead the emphasis here is fixed firmly on the notion of playing a role, wrapping yourself up in a character and then making some rather weighty decisions.

This is absolutely my jam.

The scene is set in the city of Bhimra, with the game taking its cues from a fictionalised, fantastical vision of ancient India. The years have not been kind to Bhimra and its population, and interminable famine, drought, and burgeoning slums have brought the city to the brink of utter collapse. An uneasy treaty with a neighbouring Naga empire, whose citizens are a giant race of snake people, would seem to be the answer, but in exchange for provisions and welfare, the Naga are looking for jobs for their skilled workers. Unlike Bhimra's caste system, the Naga empire allows for greater social mobility, but even so, there are only so many opportunities to go around.

That doesn't sit too well with certain pockets of Bhimra's society, however, particularly out in the slums where an influx of immigrants would seem to be the absolute last thing their city should be undertaking in a time of famine and strife. Riots start kicking off, and a royal visit to the areas of deprivation, designed to illustrate the benefits of the treaty with the Naga empire, goes horribly awry. Everything goes downhill rather quickly after that and you the player, are in charge of determining a future path for Bhimra across eight chapters and five different playable characters of varying standings and affiliations.

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Sokobond Review | Steam Molecules

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Alan Hazelden, Indie Games, PC games, Puzzle games

Sokobond Review | Steam Molecules

Platform: PC

Developer: Alan Hazelden

Sokobond is a game about making molecules.

It's so simple. Controlling a single atom, you'll move around some 2D grids in cardinal directions to bump into other atoms, locking and bonding if you each happen to have a free electron. Like a Sokoban puzzle, only with molecular bonding. Geddit? Eventually you'll form a molecule and learn an interesting science fact, all while enjoying a soothing minimalist atmosphere and subconsciously improving your basic chemistry skills. A low-key idea, but so masterful in the execution that Sokobond became one of 2013's best puzzle games.

Time makes fools of us all, and I simply didn't have enough time to pick up and review Alan Hazelden's minimalist masterpiece at launch. Now that it's headed to Steam on July 21st, however, I finally have a perfect excuse to rave about it.

Sokobond Review | Steam Molecules

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Divinity: Original Sin Review | Simply Divine

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Divinity: Original Sin, Larian Studios, PC games, RPGs

Divinity: Original Sin Review | Simply Divine

Hands up if you fancy playing one of the best RPGs of the last decade, because that's what we've got right here. I could spend 1500 or so words dissecting Divinity: Original Sin for you before delivering that conclusion, but frankly that's time that you could be spending playing Divinity: Original Sin.

Let's put it this way: if you like your old-school, isometric RPGs, if you've lamented the increasing tendencies of modern games (especially purported role-playing games) towards handholding and streamlining and other simplifications, if what you crave from an RPG is freedom and customisation and a combat system that makes you pause and think, this is the game you've been waiting for.

You should probably stop reading and go and buy it right now.

If you're still here, perhaps you need a little more convincing. Some proof, perhaps, or a little more specificity. We're back in Rivellon for this prequel to Divine Divinity, but it won't matter if you've never played a Divinity game before. You can jump straight in and starting questing to your heart's content, the only things you'll miss out on are a few "A-ha!" moments and in-jokes as previous characters make cameo appearances. You begin the game by creating two Source Hunters, who are on a mission to find the dastardly magical evil-doers that have been mucking about with the balance of things and so on and so forth. It's a fairly hackneyed story, one we've seen countless times before, but it's the way Larian tell it rather than the story itself that makes Original Sin such a delight. This game is all about freedom, choice, personality, and funny one-liners.

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Enemy Front Review – An Inglorious Bughunt

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Enemy Front, FPS games, PC games, PS3 games, Xbox 360 games

Enemy Front Review – An Inglorious Bughunt

Platforms: PS3 (reviewed) | X360 | PC

Developers: CI Games

Publishers: CI Games

I wanted to love Enemy Front, I really did. As a big WWII FPS fan, I’ve been starved for years and have only recently got a taste of the genre coming back with the ‘what if the Nazi’s won’ Wolfenstein on PS4 and the ‘let’s shoot Italians in Africa for a change’ of the recent Sniper Elite III. Enemy Front could have been another game to show that WWII is still one of the best settings for FPS titles; instead, it’s probably buried it.

The game’s ambitions are pure enough, but CI have struggled to cope with the CryEngine and basic gameplay design, producing one of this year’s biggest messes. The frame-rate crashes into single-digits whenever you go indoors, especially when moving up the stairs of any of the multiple apartment buildings. The checkpointing seems intent on making you relive the worst parts of the game whenever you bite the dust after the increasingly random number of perforations deemed acceptable is reached.

Enemy Front Review – An Inglorious Bughunt

Glitches see enemies that can only be sniped get stuck behind pillars. You can be shot by enemies through several buildings, leading to the impression you’re being shot by ghosts. Your own shots frequently fail to register in some of the worst hit detection I’ve ever seen. You’re pretty much forced to rely on sniper weapons as the close range lunacy of the jitteriest MP40 in existence suggest the lead hero has wrists made of jelly. Sometimes weapons sink into the ground when you put them down for a sec to use a rocket launcher. Stealth melee takedown animations are so lengthy that you’ll be seen by another soldier every time. The ultimate slow clap award though goes to those gifted flying Nazis that seem to get skyhooked away from the battlefield. It gets to the point where all you can do is laugh through the rage.

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Transformers: Rise of the Dark Spark Review – Grimlock Deserves Better

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Action Games, PS3 games, PS4 games, Transformers: Rise of the Dark Spark, Xbox 360 games, Xbox One Games

Transformers: Rise of the Dark Spark Review – Grimlock Deserves Better

Platform: PS3 | PS4 (reviewed) | X360 | XO

Developers:  Edge of Reality

Publishers: Activision

It’s always amused me just how much people hate Michael Bay. I mean, it’s a film about toys. Of course it’s just robots hitting each other and stuff exploding. Don’t like it? Well stop paying a fortune to watch it at the cinema thus encouraging him to make more. Seriously, I had to delete one person from facebook because they were complaining about how awful the film was despite them paying to watch it twice.

Personally, as an effects fan, I quite like the films (not seen the new one yet though), but wish they were about 45 minutes shorter. I approached the latest tie-in game with low expectations, but with a willingness to be pleasantly surprised, despite High Moon Studios -whose Cybertron series has been widely praised by critics and fans alike- not being at the helm. Fingers crossed they get to work on a brand new entry to the series once they’re done with helping out on COD: Advanced Warfare.

Transformers: Rise of the Dark Spark Review – Grimlock Deserves Better

Rise of the Dark Spark is only a tie-in the sense that it’s been released alongside the movie, as most of it takes place on Cybertron with a few Earth levels bookending the campaign. Throughout the adventure you get to play as a large number of Autobots and Decepticons. The game handles like a standard third-person shooter with you mowing down waves of enemies with a variety of light and heavy weapons.

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The Wolf Among Us: Episode 5 - Cry Wolf Review | Leader Of The Pack

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Adventure Games, iOS games, PC games, PS3 games, Telltale Games, The Wolf Among Us, Xbox 360 games

The Wolf Among Us: Episode 5 - Cry Wolf Review | Leader Of The Pack

Platforms: PCPSNXBLA

Developer: Telltale Games

Decisions, decisions. We've made plenty of them during the last four episodes of The Wolf Among Us, some big, some small, some tough and others seemingly simple, but it's finally time to find out whether any of them really mattered in the long run. Everything rests on whether Episode 5: Cry Wolf can tie up the series in a satisfying and bittersweet fashion, while atoning for the stodgy pacing of the last chapter.

Put simply: it does. Not only is Cry Wolf an emphatic end to Telltale's first Fables collaboration, a stylish, menacing, comprehensive and deeply rewarding experience from pacey start to shocking finish,  but it's also one of the best pieces of interactive entertainment they've ever released.

We've been keeping our reviews free of major spoilers, so you can read our verdict on Episode 123 and 4 to get the measure of the series thus far. Our final verdict is no exception, meaning that the following few hundred words will be heavy on opinion and light on description.

The Wolf Among Us: Episode 5 - Cry Wolf Review | Leader Of The Pack

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Guacamelee! Super Turbo Championship Edition Review | The Whole Enchilada!

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Brawler, Drinkbox Studios, Metroidvania, PC games, PS4 games, Wii U games, Xbox 360 games, Xbox One Games

Guacamelee! Super Turbo Championship Edition Review | The Whole Enchilada!

Platforms: PC | PS4 | Wii U | Xbox 360 | Xbox One (reviewed, £11.99)

Developer: DrinkBox Studios

'MetroidVania' platformers may be as ancient as Mother Brain and wall chickens, but they still pull in the punters. From Shadow Complex to Dust: An Elysian Tail and Strider, there's nothing more satisfying than constantly earning new skills and abilities while exploring brilliantly-designed levels, then eventually backtracking to beat challenges and humiliate enemies that once lorded it over us. Guacamelee! proved to be a superb example of the genre back when it released as a PSN exclusive last year, offering all the bells and whistles we expect, only with a heaped serving of spicy Mexican flavour to punch things up.

Indeed, punching things up was the aim of the game, only our newfound identity as a superpowered Luchador also let us throw down on Day Of The Dead-themed skeletal hordes with wrestling moves, smash our way through Aztec temples and occasionally turn into a chicken for the sheer merry heck of it. Pollo power!

Fifteen months later and the Super Turbo Championship Edition has arrived on new-gen consoles, Wii U, PC and Xbox 360, boasting updated visuals, new content and all the previously-released DLC. You could say that it's the whole enchilada. Since it's currently free for Xbox One owners and available as a free upgrade for PS4 gamers who picked up the original, it's high time we gave this fierce fiesta our full attention.

Guacamelee! Super Turbo Championship Edition Review | The Whole Enchilada!

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Concursion Review | What's The Big Idea?

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Indie Games, PC games, Platformer, Puuba, Puzzle games, SHMUP

Concursion Review | What's The Big Idea?

Platform: PC (£8.99)

Developer: Puuba

Publisher: Mastertronic

"I love the idea behind Concursion" is a nasty little backhanded compliment, but it must be paid. This astoundingly ambitious indie project is built around a sensational premise: exploring five different classic genres that continually bleed into and feed off one another as the barriers between them collapse. One moment you'll be jumping on nasties and leaping over pitfalls, the next you'll be piloting a spaceship or racing through a Pac-Man maze, experiencing completely different mechanics and combining multiple gameplay styles in increasingly imaginative ways.

It's the sort of radical Big Idea™ that can turn a modest little boutique title into a cult classic, and make an indie experiment more than the sum of its individual parts.

This will be paramount for Concursion, unfortunately, because its individual parts don't hold up under scrutiny. What can charitably be described as a deliciously inventive genre hybrid could equally be labelled as five rubbish games bound together in a uniquely fascinating way.

Concursion Review | What's The Big Idea?

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Sniper Elite III Review – Better than a bullet in the nads

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
FPS games, PC games, PS3 games, PS4 games, Sniper Elite 3, third person shooter, Xbox 360 games, Xbox One Games

Sniper Elite III Review – Better than a bullet in the nads

Format: PS3 | PS4 (reviewed) | X360 | XO |PC

Developer: Rebellion

Publisher: 505 Games

Sniper Elite III has opted for a change of scenery for its latest long-range melon buster and visits the sandy vistas of Africa during World War II. Unlike most WWII games, there’s a surprising lack of Nazis, instead you’re generally shooting Italians with ze Germans apparently not being fans of the searing heat.

Scenery change aside, it’s business as usual, shooting Axis soldiers from oh-so far away, with gruesome slow-mo detail accompanying most shots. The series’ stable gore looks more grisly than ever on the new consoles. Skulls explode, teeth smash from jaws, bones snap, insides are ripped through and of course testicle shots are back. On the default settings, I soon tired of these slow-motion killshots that follow the bullet from your gun right up to its messy destination. I’d advise dipping into the options to turn down the frequency of them as they lose their impact by the end of the first stage otherwise. They also make it difficult to keep track of nearby enemies between shots.

Sniper Elite III Review – Better than a bullet in the nads

There’s a tagging feature that does allow you to mark enemies via use of your binoculars. Marked soldiers will then appear through any surface, in a similar way to Far Cry 3. It’s a shame you can’t tag them through your sniper scope as switching back and forth between the rifle and binoculars is a cumbersome experience.

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The Secret World: Issue #9 - The Black Signal Review | Welcome To Tokyo

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
DLC, EA, Expansion, funcom, MMORPG, PC games, Puzzle games, Survival Horror

The Secret World: Issue #9 - The Black Signal Review | Welcome To Tokyo

Platform: PC

Developer: Funcom

Publisher: Funcom / EA

I've said it before and I'll say it again: you probably ought to investigate The Secret World. It's an MMORPG like no other, a thought-provoking, deeply atmospheric and peerlessly-written experiment that flies in the face of everything you'd expect from the genre. A twisted version of our world where everything is true, every fairy tale, conspiracy theory and horror story, where a working knowledge of sheet music and ISBN numbers is just as important as a deadly skill rotation. Not to mention steely nerves and a willingness to actually flex your grey matter.

Shame about the ending, though. The Secret World closed like a TV season finale, promising grand revelations and a triumphant return to Tokyo: the horrifying ground zero that kickstarted the game's events. Two years and a shift from subscriptions to 'buy once,-play forever' later and I'm finally in a position to say "konichiwa" from Kaidan. Promising a new playfield, horizontal progression system and the beginning of the end for the current story arc (if time is actually linear in The Secret World... goodness, there's a whole separate article in there), this is the descent into madness we've been waiting for.

The Secret World: Issue #9 - The Black Signal Review | Welcome To Tokyo

Was it worth the wait? For both hardcore and lapsed fans, Issue #9 is arguably the pinnacle of the experience thus far. A terrifying, chilling, haunting, deeply referential lungful of filthy air.

My wisdom flows so sweet. Taste and see.

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SQUIDS Odyssey 3DS Review | Calamari Cannons To Go

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
3DS Games, Artillery games, Indie Games, SRPG, Strategy games, The Game Bakers

SQUIDS Odyssey 3DS Review | Calamari Cannons To Go

Platform: 3DS, also on Wii U (eShop, £9.99)

Developer: The Game Bakers

"Every once in a while, a mobile game comes along that delivers quality and value consistent with a full-price handheld console release. A game that offers an experience that wouldn't feel out of place on the DS with a premium price tag... but costs next to nothing. SQUIDS is one of those games." - Mobot iOS review, 2011

Deja vu much? This will make for the third time I've reviewed SQUIDS in as many years, and the fact that I still enjoy the experience speaks volumes about the quality and enjoyment factor of this crazy genre hybrid. Whether on iOS, Android or now Wii U, the squishy underwater lovechild of Fire Emblem and Angry Birds still manages to blend strategy with artillery and a huge dose of silly referential humour.

SQUIDS Odyssey 3DS Review | Calamari Cannons To Go

And now it's on 3DS, a big fat fully content-and-feature-complete edition with an IAP-free economy that also grants you a free copy of the Wii U version here in Europe (details here). As such, this review is going to be short and sweet, since we already covered the original Wii U eShop release in May. Instead of rehashing old ground, we'll focus on what makes this new version different, better and wetter than its predecessors.

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Munin Review | So Raven

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Daedelic Entertainment, Gojira, PC games, Platformers, Puzzle games

Munin Review | So Raven

Platform: PC (£6.99)

Developer: Gojira

Publisher: Daedelic Entertainment

All is not well in Midgard. Munin, Odin's loyal spy and informant, has been transformed into a mortal human by the nefarious Loki and set adrift in a dangerous 2D world. Flightless but not helpless, our heroine sets out to reclaim her feathers and return to her place on Odin's shoulder by...

...erm, rotating some tiles. For eight hours.

Anyone expecting a radical new adaptation or in-depth exploration of Norse mythology should lower their expectations immediately, because Munin is very much a puzzle game first and foremost that does the bare minimum to embrace the setting (beyond a handful of names, attractive art direction a handful of text screens written in a deeply ugly typeface). However, patient players who crave an exceptionally challenging platform puzzler with a penchant for deadly physics-based traps will be in their element.

Munin Review | So Raven

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One Piece: Unlimited World Red Review | The New Gold Standard For Anime Tie-Ins?

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
3DS Games, Action RPG, Brawler, Games reviews, Ganbarion, PS Vita games, PS3 games, Wii U games, Xbox 360 games

One Piece: Unlimited World Red Review | The New Gold Standard For Anime Tie-Ins?

Platforms: 3DS | PS3 | PS Vita | Wii U (reviewed)

Developer: Ganbarion

Publisher: Bandai Namco

Cards on the table: I love One Piece. Granted, there's a world of deeper, more exciting and incredibly tedious anime/manga franchises out there, but for me there's nothing quite like watching madcap super-powered pirates fighting each other, engaging in hilarious banter, learning intense lessons about comradeship and doing almost no actual piracy whatsoever.

It's the sweet spot of irrepressible humour, great characters, shapeshifting reindeer, stretchy protagonists, violin-playing skeleton musicians and swordsmen so badass they hold a third blade in their teeth. And, as such, perfect videogame material. Even the incredibly inconsistent Omega Force managed to make an excellent Dynasty Warriors spin-off in One Piece: Pirate Warriors 2, but Gabarion have gone one step further by basing their latest tie-in on something more profound.

One Piece: Unlimited World Red Review | The New Gold Standard For Anime Tie-Ins?

Namely Monster Hunter. It's a concoction that shouldn't work, yet in practice makes for one of the best anime tie-ins ever developed: a gorgeous, enormous and surprisingly compelling game that lasts for hours on end.

Though, as I made sure to mention in the very first sentence of this review, I'm a fan myself. Bear that in mind, won't you?

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Valiant Hearts: The Great War Review – An Essential Journey

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
PC games, PS3 games, PS4 games, Ubisoft Montpellier, Valiant Hearts: The Great War, Xbox 360 games, Xbox One Games

Valiant Hearts: The Great War Review – An Essential Journey

Platforms: PS3 (reviewed) | PS4 | 360 | XO | PC

Developer: Ubisoft Montpellier

Publisher: Ubisoft

With a World War I setting, Valiant Hearts: The Great War explores relatively unfamiliar ground for gaming, or even movies to be honest, as it was generally WWII that inspired so many films and games. It’s hard to believe that the human race had the capacity for war again after the events of WWI and Valiant Hearts plays an important role in showing us that this was one of the darkest moments of humanity’s very chequered past.

Unlike most war games though, Valiant Hearts isn’t another one-man-army first-person shooter or a strategic tactical sim. It’s a heavily story-driven experience with puzzling and old-school adventuring at the core of the gameplay.

Valiant Hearts: The Great War Review – An Essential Journey

The hand-drawn visuals ensure that you’ll fall in love with the game early on and they certainly helped open a few doors for the game in terms of coverage when it was first announced. Like Rayman Legends and Child of Light, the game uses Ubisoft’s fantastic UbiArt engine that brings hand-drawn images to life in a way that other engines can only dream of. Valiant Hearts goes for the solid colours and thick black lines of a comic book style instead of the moving watercolours we saw with Child of Light, proving for any doubters the versatility of the engine.

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WildStar Review | Finale - A Cozmotronic Effort

Author:
Carl Phillips
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Carbine Studios, Games reviews, MMORPGs, NCsoft, PC games, WildStar

WildStar Review | Finale - A Cozmotronic Effort

Platform: PC

Developer: Carbine Studios

Publisher: NCSOFT

Here we are – finally at end of the review that just wouldn’t stop coming (blame Carbine accordingly for their gigantic game, I say.) There’s still a lot to get through before the verdict, but here’s a helpful hub if you’ve missed my previous instalments or want a refresher on my previous musings on WildStar.

WildStar Review | Part 1 – Initial Impressions | WildStar Review Part 2 | Blazing a trail with PvE content | WildStar Review | Part 3 – Arts & Crafts… for money!

We begin this instalment by taking a look at the Limited Action Sets and the AMP system, which acts as the skills and talent tree for WildStar respectively. As long as players are out of combat, the flexibility and user friendly nature of the LAS is one of my favourite aspects of Carbine’s efforts. Being able to swap out abilities at a moment’s notice ensures players can try new tactics and combos, along with the option of powering up equipped abilities with Tier Points to unlock bonus effects. On top of this, being able to buy new abilities from the menu without having to travel to a trainer is a godsend, as it means players no longer have to make their way back to the nearest one upon levelling up (something a lot of MMOs still do, annoyingly.)

WildStar Review | Finale - A Cozmotronic Effort

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GRID Autosport Review | Last-Gen, First Class

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Codemasters, Codemasters Racing, PC games, PS3 games, Racing Games, Xbox 360 games

GRID Autosport Review | Last-Gen, First Class

Platforms: PC (reviewed) | PS3 | Xbox 360

Developer: Codemasters Racing

Publisher: Codemasters

GRID Autosport doesn't have an in-car cockpit view. It has two in-car cockpit views.

Despite releasing a scant twelve months after GRID 2, Codemasters' latest track racer addresses every criticism that fans levelled at last year's mixed effort. And then some. Awkward drift-heavy handling has been replaced by tight grippy simulation. Instead of no driving assists whatsoever, we can access every optional helping hand imaginable, letting us scale the experience to our specifications. An idiotic story about social media gives way to a freeform campaign that Milestone would be proud of, complete with five totally different disciplines and AI that fights back, preparing drivers for an enormous multiplayer suite powered by the RaceNet sevice.

In short it's everything that dedicated racing fans wanted from GRID 2... but by tuning, tweaking and expanding upon practically everything in the package, GRID Autosport is also deeply impressive in its own right.

GRID Autosport Review | Last-Gen, First Class

You could even argue that it's five track racers in one, spanning TOCA to tyre-shredding street showdowns.

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Company of Heroes 2: The Western Front Armies Review | Strategic Expansion

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Company of Heroes 2, Company Of Heroes 2: The Western Front Armies, PC games, Relic Entertainment, Sega, Strategy games

Company of Heroes 2: The Western Front Armies Review | Strategic Expansion

Relic have listened to their fanbase. It's taken a year, but the Public Games List option is now absolutely A Thing you can have in Company of Heroes 2 thanks to the arrival of a standalone expansion pack that sees the focus of the war move from the Siberian wastes and the Eastern Front across to a whole bunch of battlefields in and around Belgium. Finally, finally there's a server list to make configuring online multiplayer matches that much easier. It's about damn time.

In many ways, The Western Front Armies feels like an old-school expansion rather than the DLC drops we tend to see these days. Though there's nothing new per se for singleplayer strategy fans to get stuck into in terms of campaign missions, but TWFA's release heralds the arrival of two new factions: the US Allied forces and the Oberkommando West Axis army for a bunch of skirmish shenanigans, and online battles. Company of Heroes has always been a series where the offline components are really just the means by which you get to grips with the depth of tactical systems before taking your strategic brain online and pitting your abilities against other armchair generals across the globe.

The Western Front Armies doesn't require the base game so if you want to jump straight in at the deep end, you absolutely can, but here's how it works:

You're essentially purchasing the use of the new factions, along with the usual COH2 multiplayer modes, and the various tweaks and improvements that Relic have made over the last twelve months. You can buy the use of the US or Oberkommando West forces individually for around a tenner, or pay five quid more to bag them both. That needs you all of teh COH2 multiplayer goodness you could want (Theatre of War content aside), along with AI skirmish options for your purchased factions if you fancy a little bit of offline practice. You won't be able to play as the Soviet or Wehrmacht forces if you don't own the base game, but you will be able to play against COH2 veterans who haven't upgraded, so the player pool is kept nice and large. Better yet, there's no real map restriction. As well as the eight new maps included with TWFA, you'll be able to play on any of the original COH2 maps as long as one of the players in your match has the base game.

But you can buy the complete base game for less than the price of one multiplayer faction in TWFA, so what's new?

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Outlast Xbox One Review | On Xbox At Last

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Horror games, Indie Games, PC games, PS4 games, Red Barrels Games, Xbox One Games

Outlast Xbox One Review | On Xbox At Last

Platforms: PC | PS4 | Xbox One (reviewed)

Developer: Red Barrels

I'm so glad that I didn't have to review Outlast.

Despite picking up the first-person asylum crawler in a January GOG sale, it was too late to critique and that suited me just fine. The first hour creeped me out enough to turn on the lights, quit to desktop and then procrastinate for the best part of six months; blaming my review workload rather than my lily-liver. I don't scare easy, but Outlast terrified me effortlessly. It then released on PS4 as a PlayStation Plus freebie, but since I haven't bought the console yet, I assumed that one of my comrades would take the plunge.

They didn't. Never mind. We'll have to do without a review on-site, then, since Microsoft's indie parity clause means that there'll never be an Xbox One version that I'll have to review as the only Dealspwn staff member who owns the system. Right?

Outlast Xbox One Review | On Xbox At Last

Oh bugger.

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Sixty Second Shooter Prime Review | Does Xbox One Have Its Geometry Wars?

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Games reviews, Happion Labs, ID@Xbox, SHMUP, Xbox One Games

Sixty Second Shooter Prime Review | Does Xbox One Have Its Geometry Wars?

Platform: Xbox One (XBLA, £3.99)

Developer: Happion Labs

I bet that Happion Labs are already sick and and tired of the comparison, but when a game looks like Geometry Wars, swims like Geometry Wars and quacks like Geometry Wars, then it's probably a duck. I mean, Geometry Wars.

However, Sixty Second Shooter Prime is faster, significantly cheaper and much more aggressive than its inspiration, having honed a truly manic playstyle from its roots as a humble Chrome app through the PlayStation Vita. As the name suggests, you've got sixty seconds to kick as much posterior as possible, securing a high score by tactically advancing through levels, perfectly deploying powerups, exploiting a slow-motion chain mechanic and dying an awful lot in the process.

You're not just surviving: you're packing as much neon death as possible into one mad minute.

Sixty Second Shooter Prime Review | Does Xbox One Have Its Geometry Wars?

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WildStar Review Part 3 | Arts & Crafts… for money!

Author:
Carl Phillips
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Carbine Studios, MMORPGs, NCsoft, PC, WildStar

WildStar Review Part 3 | Arts & Crafts… for money!

Platform: PC

Developer: Carbine Studios

Publisher: NCSOFT

Our in-depth and ever-growing review continues for WildStar - because if you're going to do something, you may as well drag it out for several weeks. Or do it properly considering the size of the game. Yes - let's go with that one. If you're a latecomer to the party that is my review, or if you're a swine who has been all like "MMOs? Nah," then I suggest you SHUT THE HELL UP and check out the convenient hub I've provided below for you to click on.

WildStar Review | Part 1 – Initial Impressions | WildStar Review Part 2 | Blazing a trail with PvE content

One of the biggest complaints about MMOs in general is the crafting and economy elements. Cries of “it’s too complicated!” or “it’s too boring!” can be heard from across the interwebs, as a large percentage of those that try it will simply go “nah, it’s not for me” before becoming a hoarder of all the crafting materials they can find, vendoring away at the earliest opportunity. Thankfully, Carbine have created mechanics that are not only varied in nature, but far more hands-on than first glance, providing a multiple levels of depth depending on the comfort zone of the player.

I won’t go all FAQ here with the details (if you want that you can find my rather in-depth article on it here) so I’ll give a quick overview - It’s the usual affair of selecting two professions out of the bunch that are available, some of which are better paired than others, while everyone has the ability to cook (labelled as a ‘hobby’ activity.) The strong theme with these crafting elements is that of player choice, providing players with the ability to customise items with stats needed for specific roles (or, if things are being made to order, with a specific balance of stats for maximum class build efficiency.)

WildStar Review Part 3 | Arts & Crafts… for money!

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