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Infamous: First Light Review | Go Fetch

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Action Games, DLC, Expansion, Infamous: First Light, PS4 games, Sandbox games, Sony Computer Entertainment, Sucker Punch

Infamous: First Light Review | Go Fetch

I had a blast with Infamous: Second Son. For me, it was probably the best game in the series thus far, a polished experience that did the basics incredibly well, delivered some cracking performances from its leading stars, and dazzled the senses with a gorgeous Seattle sandbox and plenty of interesting abilities. It didn't seek to really break new ground or reinvent the wheel, but Second Son was supremely satisfying because Sucker Punch managed to nail things where they counted -- combat, traversal, scale, story. Would it have been nice to have Seattle live and breathe a little more rather than simply being an obviously gamified sandbox? Perhaps. But frankly I was having too much fun to really care.

Given the hot topic of female protagonists in the gaming industry, it's not surprising really that Sucker Punch were asked in the run up to Second Son's release about the possibility of a female playable protagonist. That questioning only became stronger when we were introduced to Abigail "Fetch" Walker -- a Neon-powered Conduit with some serious baggage in her past and a heavy chip on her shoulder. That Sucker Punch followed through and have given us a fat slab of Fetch's backstory to play through here in First Light is admirable.

More importantly, it's pretty damn good.

Laura Bailey is back to voice Fetch, and once again, the strength of Sucker Punch's performance capture really comes through. Anyone familiar with her story in Second Son will already know the end state of this prequel, set two years before the events of the original game. Fetch is making a living on the streets with her brother in First Light, making ends meet by doing unsavoury jobs for unsavoury people. By the time we meet her in Second Son, she's lost a huge deal, not least a sense of control, and First Light tells the story of how she goes from being a woman trying to hide her powers to being a Conduit fixer and assassin, to eventually becoming a powerful renegade filled with rage and anger.

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Metro Redux Review | Nuclear Family

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
4A Games, Deep Silver, FPS games, Metro 2033, Metro Redux, Metro: Last Light

Metro Redux Review | Nuclear Family

Remasters and reduxes are all the rage right now. It's an easy way to make a quick buck, after all, and recycle some of the best experiences of last-gen, keeping the cash coming in and hopefully picking up one or two newcomers along the way. There'll always be questions as to the deserving nature of these revamped games, particularly when it comes to titles  barely a generation old, but there's something to be said for 4A Games' Metro double header getting the current-gen treatment.

Metro 2033 once used to be the benchmark for graphics card tests, and the original version still holds up pretty well on PC, but the Redux version really is a step up, with 4A porting 2033 over into Last Light's engine. The visual tweaks and upgrades are all as you'd expect: textures have been overhauled and remodelled, there's a deeper colour palette, and noticeably improved lighting -- all of which makes for a game that's somehow even more atmospheric than when it came around the first time. Better yet, 4A have redone a number of the cutscenes in 2033 to keep players in first-person mode, minimising immersion-breaking occurrences.

PC gamers might not necessarily find these upgrades particularly worthwhile, but on PS4, the games really do feel new-gen, particularly Last Light which is now far closer to its PC sibling and has some absolutely dazzling lighting effects to behold. The visual detail across both games is now realised fantastically on consoles, and the improved clothing physics, improved facial constructions and character animations in 2033, really make for a seamless experience. The console versions still can't quite boast the particle effects of the PC equivalent, but it's a marked step up.

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The Last Tinker: City of Colors Review | My Eyes!

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Action Games, PC games, Platformer, PS4 games

The Last Tinker: City of Colors Review | My Eyes!

Platforms: PS4 (reviewed) | PC

Developer: Mimimi Productions

Publisher: Loot Entertainment

It’s a little sad that I begin most of my platformer reviews by stating what a shame it is that the genre has all but disappeared from modern console line-ups, with only Ratchet & Clank doing their best to keep it alive. But with Insomniac aligning their studio closer to Xbox nowadays, it may be a while before the duo return. Let’s not talk about Knack either.

So, when browsing this week’s releases I was pleasantly surprised to see a new IP amongst the PSN releases and a quick trailer search later revealed it to be a new platformer. One download later and I’m in the world of The Last Tinker: City of Colors.

The Last Tinker: City of Colors Review | My Eyes!

But, where’s the jump button? I just hold R2 to run and I’ll just ‘platform’ automatically? What!? So much for rekindling the platformer genre. To be fair, I should have known this game was aimed at a very young audience thanks to the mega-bright hyper-coloured visuals. We’ve nothing against games aimed at the younger kids though here at Dealspwn, as anything that eases new gamers in should be applauded, which is certainly the best way to look at this action-sort-of-platformer.

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Hohokum Review | Worms United

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Cross-buy, Hohokum, Honeyslug, PS Vita games, PS3 games, PS4 games, Richard Hogg, Sony Santa Monica, Videos

Hohokum Review | Worms United

Hohokum is beautifully endearing, whimsically comical, filled with bold colours and sumptuous aural dreamscapes. Its fluid mechanics are simple and straightforward, allowing players to concentrate on finding ways to interact with the cartoonish worlds and uncovering little visual rewards for their troubles.

But I found it to be somewhat problematic at first.

Hohokum feels like you're playing through a drug-induced cartoon from half a century ago in some ways. I half expected to be ambushed by Blue Meanies as I meandered through its myriad worlds. It's lovely to behold with its bright, bold colour scheme and cutesy art courtesy of Richard Hogg. I spent a good deal of time in one chamber of the game where the long, snake-like, cycloptic rainbow eel thingy that you control links up with a bunch of friends and they all respond to your controller inputs for a bit. It was like playing with a virtual spirograph, and I just danced for a bit with my rainbow eel chums and I looked up and I'd been doing it for almost half an hour.

That's probably my favourite bit of Hohokum so far, to be honest. it's a simple game once you peel away the quirky art. You steer this one-eyed spectrum snake around, occasionally slowing it down, sometimes speeding it up. And that's it. There are a bunch of multi-screen levels to the game that present you with some sort of bizarre tableau and just leave you to figure things out for yourselves. It's like a PixelJunk Proteus in some ways, or what Nokia's Snake did during the acid years, forgetting all about eating that square pixel, and going on a colourful bender.

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Gravity Badgers Review | Great Name, Shame About The Game

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Mobile games, PC games, PS Vita games, Puzzle games, Wales Interactive, Wii U games

Gravity Badgers Review | Great Name, Shame About The Game

Platform: PS Vita (reviewed)

Developer: Wales Interactive

Gravity Badgers joins the illustrious line of rubbish games with fantastic names. Though nowhere near as bad as the genuinely offensive Hyper Fighters, this Angry Birds clone really does the bare minimum to live up to its sensational monicker.

Seriously: Gravity Badgers. Gravity. Badgers. What a waste.

I never, ever, use the term 'clone' lightly, but I'm afraid that Gravity Badgers earns it hands-down. We find ourselves flinging badgers into outer space by virtually pulling back and dragging them across the screen, only instead of castles, they're presented with an array of physics-based obstacles. Critically, celestial bodies can either attract or repel your furry cosmonaut, deflecting their path towards the exit. Judge it right and you can pull off crazy slingshot effects; mis-cue and you'll send your badger into deep space.

Gravity Badgers Review | Great Name, Shame About The Game

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Table Top Racing Vita Review | Little Cars, Big Smiles

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
PS Vita games, Racing Games, Table Top Racing

Table Top Racing Vita Review | Little Cars, Big Smiles

Platform: PS Vita

Developers: Playrise Digital

Publisher: Ripstone

Racers, start your engines! Well, charge up your PlayStation Vitas first, as I’ve no doubt many of you haven’t had a reason to put it on for a while unless you’re a fan of niche Japanese titles. But that’s about to change and for a no-excuses price of £4.99 too.

Table Top Racing is an arcade racing title with healthy influences from the likes of Micro Machines and the weapon-sporting Mashed (but not Wrecked, thankfully). You race miniature toy cars across a range of tracks that include sushi restaurants, picnic areas and tables full of junk. Every course is fantastically designed with lots of tight turns and sudden shear edges that keep the racing pack together throughout.

Table Top Racing Vita Review | Little Cars, Big Smiles

Slight rubber-banding keeps the races tight too, but when some laps are as short as twenty seconds it never feels unfair. The AI is sharp too, especially in the later tournaments. Unlike many racers with weapons though, the AI don’t just focus on you, instead they’ll ruthlessly fight amongst themselves, often providing you with a chance to slip by an angry huddle, although you’ll often risk a rocket up the backside for such slyness.

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MIND: Path to Thalamus Review | Dreaming of You

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Carlos Coronado, Indie Games, MIND: Path to Thalamus, Puzzle games

MIND: Path to Thalamus Review | Dreaming of You

The term "game" is rapidly becoming more and more reductive. It implies something frivolous, something inseparable from play, and although so much of what this industry does is provide us with ways to play, to relax, to unwind, and to otherwise entertain ourselves, the term ignores the fact that this interactive medium is better equipped than most to deal with serious subject matter in a profoundly affecting manner.

The term "game" is ill at ease with the first-person exploration titles like Dear Esther and Gone Home, with the experiential delights of Journey and Proteus, and its a term that I apply loosely to MIND: Path to Thalamus simply because we've failed to collectively come up with a better one as an industry. If you were looking for a different description, though, I might tell you it was an interactive narrative journey, or the gamified manifestation of a protagonist's guilty psyche, or a mind-bending first-person puzzler that's heavy on psychological reflection and magical realism.

The elevator pitch is ambitious, and MIND is certainly a game that feels a bit unique, a little bit special at times. When its elements all come together, Path to Thalamus has the capability to really engage and engross. Unfortunately, it's a shame that there are a few things here that conspire to make the game something of an uneven experience.

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Oddworld: New ‘N’ Tasty Review | Abe's Oddysee Reborn

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
HD remake, Oddworld: New 'N' Tasty, Platform games, PS4 games, Stealth Games

Oddworld: New ‘N’ Tasty Review | Abe's Oddysee Reborn

Platforms: PS4 | PS3, Vita, XO, PC and Wii U versions coming soon

Developers: Just Add Water

Publishers: Just Add Water

Abe’s Oddysee was a big hit for PS1 gamers back in the day with impressive pre-rendered backgrounds making the game one of the best looking 2D platformers ever made. It was also an absolute beast of a meanie to play. Nevertheless, when we heard Just Add Water were remaking the game with the Unity engine we couldn’t wait to see how well the game had aged. Not so sure about the name change though.

For the most part, the game is the same as the original. The action still takes place on a 2D plane and the level layouts haven’t been changed. However, some sensible changes have been implemented, and for the better too.

Oddworld: New ‘N’ Tasty Review | Abe's Oddysee Reborn

Instead of the action taking place on individual screens that you’d enter from the side, they now take place on a seamless scrolling screen. This sounds like sacrilege, but JAW have adapted the game fantastically, losing none of the original’s feel of suddenly happening across traps or waking up the angry sligs.

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Eidolon Review | Lonely Forests

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Eidolon, Ice Water Games, Indie Games, PC games

Eidolon Review | Lonely Forests

What do you do when you're plonked down into an enormous, minimalistic forest with no context and no immediately discernible objective?

Well, you walk.

There's a lot of walking in Eidolon, a new exploratory survival-adventure title from Ice Water Games. It's one of those games where you wander about a visually striking world, piecing together the fragments of a narrative from letters and journal entries and maps and other assorted things left behind by people who aren't you. In the case of Eidolon, you learn in time that you're wandering around Washington State somewhere around the year 2400, and that's all I want to tell you given that working out exactly why you're wandering around the place, and why everything is empty and overgrown and there's no sign of human life is basically what spurs you onwards.

Eidolon is a pretty game, both in spite and because of its minimalistic, geometric approach to art design. There's something clean, refreshing even, about the bold colours, the neat lines and the ordered manner of the look of this game. I found myself rather frequently pausing and looking around, and not just because much of one's progression is predicated on orienteering (a feat made tricky when there are few discernible landmarks).

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LEGO Ninjago Nindroids Review | Go Ninja Go Ninjago

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Action Games, Hellbent Games, PS Vita games, TT Games, Warner Bros. Interactive

LEGO Ninjago Nindroids Review | Go Ninja Go Ninjago

Platforms: 3DS | PS Vita (reviewed)

Developer: Hellbent Games | TT Games

Publisher: Warner Bros. Interactive

LEGO. Ninjas. Both of these things are undeniably excellent in their own right, so I suspect that the LEGO Ninjago toy line can boast the shortest brainstorming session in company history. "We haven't sold Ninja-themed kits since 1998. So how about... more ninjas... only this time on a futuristic alien planet with multiple armies that we can keep expanding on with new sets? Also some of the ninjas are robots. We can call them Nindroids."

"That's terrible. Let's do it, and also make a mechanical dragon. We can call it the MechDragon. Have a raise."

So Ninjago was born, and in fine transmedia style, spawned an animated series followed finally by a handheld game on PS Vita and 3DS. It's the sort of eye-rolling predictable play that you'd expect from any big company, but does it live up to the usual standard we expect from TT Games?

LEGO Ninjago Nindroids Review | Go Ninja Go Ninjago

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Titanfall: Frontier's Edge Review | Come For The Update, Stay For The Maps

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
DLC, EA, multiplayer, PC games, Respawn Entertainment, Xbox 360 games, Xbox One Games

Titanfall: Frontier's Edge Review | Come For The Update, Stay For The Maps

Platforms: PC | Xbox 360 | Xbox One (reviewed, £7.99)

Developer: Respawn Entertainment

Publisher: EA

Be advised: I'm still playing Titanfall and loving it. Though many players have departed over the last few months, angrily citing the lack of a metagame and arbitrary unlockables, the evergreen gameplay and superbly designed maps of Respawn's shooter ensure me a fresh and exciting experience every time I scamper along a rooftop or crush fleeing infantry into bloody smears under steel heel.

Mind you, Titanfall dropped the ball hard post-launch, which I've poked and prodded at relentlessly. From dwindling player numbers on objective gametypes to long matchmaking times and the lack of cosmetic customisation, there's been plenty to moan about. Thankfully Respawn have managed to patch things up in any sense of the phrase, resulting in a sharper, faster, more engrossing and customisable experience after a sequence of updates. Update 5 brings a new economy into the mix that adds a new dimension to Burn Cards, alongside extra fixes and tweaks that improve and expand the gameplay experience for free.

Titanfall: Frontier's Edge Review | Come For The Update, Stay For The Maps

Frontier's Edge feels like the last piece of the puzzle: three thematic stages that lack the obvious gimmicks of Expedition's trio, designed to tempt players back onto objective gametypes with smart scalable design. Come back for the update, then stay for the maps. We'll discuss both over the next few hundred words.

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Sacred 3 Review | Borderline Blasphemy

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
ARPGs, Deep Silver, Keen Games, PC games, PS3 games, RPGs, Sacred 3, Xbox 360 games

Sacred 3 Review | Borderline Blasphemy

Is nothing Sacre...

Nope, can't do it. This is no laughing matter. Deep Silver have dredged up the bones and bits of the Sacred IP, chucked most of them out, and used the remaining pieces to assemble a game bereft of any particularly worthwhile. Sacred 3 bears the Sacred name, but it's something of a shell of a game rather than the open-world, loot-stuffed romp to which fans might be accustomed.

Gone are the expansive environments of previous, "proper" Sacred games. Indeed, Sacred 3 has more in common with Sacred Citadel than its numbered predecessor. Except it's not a side-scrolling beat 'em up designed for couch co-op -- it looks like a top-down, Sacred-esque RPG.

Sacred 3 Review | Borderline Blasphemy

But it isn't.

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So Many Me Review | Me Me Me Me Me Me Myself & I

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Extend Studio, Origo Games, OUYA games, PC games, Platformer, Puzzle games

So Many Me Review | Me Me Me Me Me Me Myself & I

Platforms: PC (reviewed) | OUYA

Developer: Extend Studio

Publisher: Origo Games

Wouldn't it be useful to have seven clones at your beck and call?  That way you could attend four different day jobs and still have doppelgängers left over for a full house of Mario Kart multiplayer. Decades of science fiction tells us that nothing can possibly go wrong with that plan. No sir.

Anyway, as a certain maniacal Agent once famously said: "the best thing about being me... there are so many MEs." In this case I'm a small green blob called Filo, tasked with saving a cheerful cartoon world in puzzly platform style. Foes need stomping, switches need pressing, bottomless pits need jumping and collectibles demand snaffling; a daunting task for a tiny gelatinous globule.

Or at least it would be if a run-in with a mysterious cosmic entity hadn't granted Filo the ability to control a small army of clones and transform them into useful platforms. And dinosaurs. And rocket-launching hovertanks.

So Many Me Review | Me Me Me Me Me Me Myself & I

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Wayward Manor Review | Scarily Mediocre

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Indie Games, Moonshark, Neil Gaiman, PC games, Puzzle games, The Odd Gentlemen, Wayward Manor

Wayward Manor Review | Scarily Mediocre

Why aren't you any fun, Wayward Manor? You're the result of a collaboration between a successful indie studio in The Odd Gentlemen -- responsible for the really rather good The Misadventures of P.B. Winterbottom -- and one of my favourite authors: Neil Gaiman; you have a promising set up that sees players taking on the role of a ghost and attempting to frighten an unwanted family out of the eponymous house; you look like a mix of the works of Tim Burton and Henry Selick...

So where did it all go wrong?

Let's break it down. Wayward Manor is a point and click puzzler set across twenty-five stages, each of which see you peering down into various rooms of the grumpy manor, itself rather wonderfully voiced by Gaiman himself, and manipulating various items and fixtures and fittings in each of these rooms to scare the unwanted family member currently inside. Six scares are required before you can summon the ghoulish energy to unleash a torrent of spectral energy that'll send the whole chamber rattling, and force your victim to flee in terror.

The manner by which you go about amassing those six scares differs in form, but not in function. The game basically revolves around you clicking the left-mouse button for everything, but timing and angles are key. Sending a mouse scurrying in front of your unsuspecting mark at just the right time involves precise deployment, as does dropping a bottle from the rafters as your target passes by. It's simple stuff, but the game restricts your abilities slightly. In each room, there are three tiers of interactive opportunities, expanding as you build up the scare count and amass more power. In the first level, you can only throw bottles around, then your influence spreads to the window shutters, and after that all bets are off.

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Gods Will Be Watching Review | Empty Prayers

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Deconstructeam, Devolver Digital, Gods Will Be Watching, Indie Games, PC games, Strategy games, Survival games

Gods Will Be Watching Review | Empty Prayers

I failed the first level of Gods Will Be Watching over ten times before I finally managed to balance hacking a computer mainframe, watching over a bunch of jittery hostages, and staving off some grenade-happy soldiers successfully. Even when I had, I still wasn't certain that I'd actually done it through my own skill and deft multitasking rather than some sort of fluke born from frustration.

The game's first level gives you four hostages and a computer system to crack. Soldiers inch their way towards you down a nearby corridor, and the only things you have to halt their progression is the threat of violence to the hostages or a spot of blind fire, both of which freak out your captives.

Gods Will Be Watching Review | Empty Prayers

The hacking progress bar takes its sweet time, and though you can charge a hacking boost in increments, each time you do, your own cyber security takes a hit. Occasionally, your corridor-covering chum will have a crisis of faith, sometimes your hostages will tell you that they're about to run or fancy ending it all or don't think you're looking, and you'll have to decide how to deal with the situation.

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Unrest Review | I Predict A Riot

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Indie Games, PC games, Pyrodactyl Games, RPGs, Unrest

Unrest Review | I Predict A Riot

Unrest is a game all about talking to people. There's little by way of direct violence in this indie RPG adventure title from Pyrodactyl Games, instead the emphasis here is fixed firmly on the notion of playing a role, wrapping yourself up in a character and then making some rather weighty decisions.

This is absolutely my jam.

The scene is set in the city of Bhimra, with the game taking its cues from a fictionalised, fantastical vision of ancient India. The years have not been kind to Bhimra and its population, and interminable famine, drought, and burgeoning slums have brought the city to the brink of utter collapse. An uneasy treaty with a neighbouring Naga empire, whose citizens are a giant race of snake people, would seem to be the answer, but in exchange for provisions and welfare, the Naga are looking for jobs for their skilled workers. Unlike Bhimra's caste system, the Naga empire allows for greater social mobility, but even so, there are only so many opportunities to go around.

That doesn't sit too well with certain pockets of Bhimra's society, however, particularly out in the slums where an influx of immigrants would seem to be the absolute last thing their city should be undertaking in a time of famine and strife. Riots start kicking off, and a royal visit to the areas of deprivation, designed to illustrate the benefits of the treaty with the Naga empire, goes horribly awry. Everything goes downhill rather quickly after that and you the player, are in charge of determining a future path for Bhimra across eight chapters and five different playable characters of varying standings and affiliations.

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Sokobond Review | Steam Molecules

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Alan Hazelden, Indie Games, PC games, Puzzle games

Sokobond Review | Steam Molecules

Platform: PC

Developer: Alan Hazelden

Sokobond is a game about making molecules.

It's so simple. Controlling a single atom, you'll move around some 2D grids in cardinal directions to bump into other atoms, locking and bonding if you each happen to have a free electron. Like a Sokoban puzzle, only with molecular bonding. Geddit? Eventually you'll form a molecule and learn an interesting science fact, all while enjoying a soothing minimalist atmosphere and subconsciously improving your basic chemistry skills. A low-key idea, but so masterful in the execution that Sokobond became one of 2013's best puzzle games.

Time makes fools of us all, and I simply didn't have enough time to pick up and review Alan Hazelden's minimalist masterpiece at launch. Now that it's headed to Steam on July 21st, however, I finally have a perfect excuse to rave about it.

Sokobond Review | Steam Molecules

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Divinity: Original Sin Review | Simply Divine

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Divinity: Original Sin, Larian Studios, PC games, RPGs

Divinity: Original Sin Review | Simply Divine

Hands up if you fancy playing one of the best RPGs of the last decade, because that's what we've got right here. I could spend 1500 or so words dissecting Divinity: Original Sin for you before delivering that conclusion, but frankly that's time that you could be spending playing Divinity: Original Sin.

Let's put it this way: if you like your old-school, isometric RPGs, if you've lamented the increasing tendencies of modern games (especially purported role-playing games) towards handholding and streamlining and other simplifications, if what you crave from an RPG is freedom and customisation and a combat system that makes you pause and think, this is the game you've been waiting for.

You should probably stop reading and go and buy it right now.

If you're still here, perhaps you need a little more convincing. Some proof, perhaps, or a little more specificity. We're back in Rivellon for this prequel to Divine Divinity, but it won't matter if you've never played a Divinity game before. You can jump straight in and starting questing to your heart's content, the only things you'll miss out on are a few "A-ha!" moments and in-jokes as previous characters make cameo appearances. You begin the game by creating two Source Hunters, who are on a mission to find the dastardly magical evil-doers that have been mucking about with the balance of things and so on and so forth. It's a fairly hackneyed story, one we've seen countless times before, but it's the way Larian tell it rather than the story itself that makes Original Sin such a delight. This game is all about freedom, choice, personality, and funny one-liners.

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Enemy Front Review – An Inglorious Bughunt

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Enemy Front, FPS games, PC games, PS3 games, Xbox 360 games

Enemy Front Review – An Inglorious Bughunt

Platforms: PS3 (reviewed) | X360 | PC

Developers: CI Games

Publishers: CI Games

I wanted to love Enemy Front, I really did. As a big WWII FPS fan, I’ve been starved for years and have only recently got a taste of the genre coming back with the ‘what if the Nazi’s won’ Wolfenstein on PS4 and the ‘let’s shoot Italians in Africa for a change’ of the recent Sniper Elite III. Enemy Front could have been another game to show that WWII is still one of the best settings for FPS titles; instead, it’s probably buried it.

The game’s ambitions are pure enough, but CI have struggled to cope with the CryEngine and basic gameplay design, producing one of this year’s biggest messes. The frame-rate crashes into single-digits whenever you go indoors, especially when moving up the stairs of any of the multiple apartment buildings. The checkpointing seems intent on making you relive the worst parts of the game whenever you bite the dust after the increasingly random number of perforations deemed acceptable is reached.

Enemy Front Review – An Inglorious Bughunt

Glitches see enemies that can only be sniped get stuck behind pillars. You can be shot by enemies through several buildings, leading to the impression you’re being shot by ghosts. Your own shots frequently fail to register in some of the worst hit detection I’ve ever seen. You’re pretty much forced to rely on sniper weapons as the close range lunacy of the jitteriest MP40 in existence suggest the lead hero has wrists made of jelly. Sometimes weapons sink into the ground when you put them down for a sec to use a rocket launcher. Stealth melee takedown animations are so lengthy that you’ll be seen by another soldier every time. The ultimate slow clap award though goes to those gifted flying Nazis that seem to get skyhooked away from the battlefield. It gets to the point where all you can do is laugh through the rage.

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Transformers: Rise of the Dark Spark Review – Grimlock Deserves Better

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Action Games, PS3 games, PS4 games, Transformers: Rise of the Dark Spark, Xbox 360 games, Xbox One Games

Transformers: Rise of the Dark Spark Review – Grimlock Deserves Better

Platform: PS3 | PS4 (reviewed) | X360 | XO

Developers:  Edge of Reality

Publishers: Activision

It’s always amused me just how much people hate Michael Bay. I mean, it’s a film about toys. Of course it’s just robots hitting each other and stuff exploding. Don’t like it? Well stop paying a fortune to watch it at the cinema thus encouraging him to make more. Seriously, I had to delete one person from facebook because they were complaining about how awful the film was despite them paying to watch it twice.

Personally, as an effects fan, I quite like the films (not seen the new one yet though), but wish they were about 45 minutes shorter. I approached the latest tie-in game with low expectations, but with a willingness to be pleasantly surprised, despite High Moon Studios -whose Cybertron series has been widely praised by critics and fans alike- not being at the helm. Fingers crossed they get to work on a brand new entry to the series once they’re done with helping out on COD: Advanced Warfare.

Transformers: Rise of the Dark Spark Review – Grimlock Deserves Better

Rise of the Dark Spark is only a tie-in the sense that it’s been released alongside the movie, as most of it takes place on Cybertron with a few Earth levels bookending the campaign. Throughout the adventure you get to play as a large number of Autobots and Decepticons. The game handles like a standard third-person shooter with you mowing down waves of enemies with a variety of light and heavy weapons.

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