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Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha Review | Fun-Disc DLC

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Capcom, Capcom Vancouver, DLC, Microsoft, Xbox One, Xbox One Games

Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha Review | Fun-Disc DLC

Platform: Xbox One (£7.99)

Developer: Capcom Vancouver

Publisher: Microsoft Studios

I see what you did there, Capcom. After years of releasing 'super' and 'arcade' editions of games we already own, not to mention bucketloads of deeply questionable DLC, it's time to poke a little fun at yourselves while making amends for Dead Rising 3's calamitous season pass. Half fan service brawler, half 80s retro reference and all slightly-too-forced self parody, this colourful slice of content turns the game into a four-player hack and slasher. A bit like Streets Of Rage or Final Fight, perhaps, only with hundreds of zombies and an M. Bison boss the size of an office block.

It's galling that Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha is still technically "on-disc DLC," mind, since the files are included in the latest mandatory 4GB title update. You've just swapped a physical CD for the hard drive, Capcom; making everyone who owns the game download the content then charging to unlock it. An improvement, except that we've only got 500GB to play with and you should ask our permission before taking up valuable space with stuff we might not want.

Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha Review | Fun-Disc DLC

Never mind though, because I just dressed Frank West up as Mayor Haggar, teamed up with Nick Ramos in a sexy Felicia outfit and made lots of dead things even deader. Arcade Remix may not be subtle or particularly deep, but it sure is fun when you get some mates involved.

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Tomodachi Life Review | The Silly Social Experiment

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
3DS Games, Games reviews, Nintendo

Tomodachi Life Review | The Silly Social Experiment

Platform: 3DS

Developer: Nintendo SPD Group 1

Publisher: Nintendo

We've had a mad week here at Dealspwn.com. Not only have Matt, Carl and I been covering E3, but we also moved into our new homes on Tomodachi Island. Things escalated quickly.

We've spent our days chilling at the beach wearing hot dog costumes, playing slide puzzles with Darth Vader and visiting Switzerland. Our heavy metal band brought the house down, but Matt doesn't have much time for music ever since The Cat from Red Dwarf set him up with Jill Valentine. Shame it didn't last, even if Carl's recently been trying to introduce him to Danaerys Targaryen. I'm surprised Carl has the energy, what with his newborn kid and all, and continually losing rap battles to Reggie Fils-Aime on a daily basis. I'll catch up with them at the next communal barbecue, or perhaps enter their bizarre dreams like a friendly Freddy Krueger.

Tomodachi Life Review | The Silly Social Experiment

Replace our names with people you know and you've got Tomodachi Life in a nutshell. Less a traditional videogame and more an interactive Mad Lib, a little imagination can go a long way in this curiously addictive localised timewaster.

I wish that I was having as much fun as my virtual doppelgänger, in all honesty. Every image in this article is a direct screenshot.

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Entwined Review | Dragon Rainbow Fart

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
E3 2014, Entwined, Indie Games, Pixelopus, PS Vita games, PS3 games, PS4 games, Sony Computer Entertainment

Entwined Review | Dragon Rainbow Fart

Entwined is apparently an artistic representation of the love between a bird and a fish -- dancing about one another like a twin-stick take on a 3D Sonic bonus level. It emerged in surprising fashion at Sony's E3 press conference, a pleasant interlude between brooding, big-budget titles, that injected some colour into proceedings.

A blue, origami bird comes to rest on a body of water as twinkly music plays, and an orange papercraft fish bobs its head out the water to meet its feathery chum. They touch noses, it's all very cute. The bird guides the fish skywards, and they shoot forward down a series of psychedelic cylindrical paths that will span nine lifetimes (levels) and see player guiding the two creatures through colour-coded rings of sorts that twist and turn, creating a playful dance between the two creatures. They occupy separate halves of the screen, occasionally meeting in the middle as the coloured gates demand -- orange and blue individually, green when they meet.

The patterns of the gates/rings/checkpoints, whatever you want to call them, twist and turn, becoming more complex as the game progresses. In between these sections, you collect coloured orbs to fill progression meters for each creature. Then, if you successfully manage to guide them through the channels of rings, you keep the orbs. If you skip a ring, the bar drains. To begin with, these channels arrive one at a time in simple patterns, but it's not long before they begin to shift in length and distance, sometimes alternating at speed, before starting to move and undulate, forcing you to keep careful control over both creatures at the same time across different sticks.

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Borderlands 2 Vita Review | Impressive, But Not Quite Vital

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
2K Games, FPS, FPSRPG, Gearbox, Iron Galaxy Studios, PS Vita games, SCEE

Borderlands 2 Vita Review | Impressive, But Not Quite Vital

Platform: PS Vita

Developer: Iron Galaxy Studios

Publisher: 2K Games

Borderlands 2 is probably the most impressive handheld game I've ever played. How could it not be? It's Borderlands 2!

Not a limp little spin-off or tatty tie-in: Borderlands 2 in its entirety. Every mission, every bandit, every ridiculous procedurally-generated gun, loads of DLC, all of it. Beyond a graphical downgrade, two-player cooperative cap and a few controls remapped to the rear touch pad, this is nothing less than the full PS3 version, even allowing you to transfer save files and Badass Ranks between the two platforms.

And that's a problem. Handheld games need to be designed and optimised specifically for their platform, but Iron Galaxy were locked into delivering an identical port, meaning that they had to find some corners to cut along the way. Many of which can make Borderlands 2's portable version as disappointing as it is astonishing.

Borderlands 2 Vita Review | Impressive, But Not Quite Vital

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Mario Kart 8 Review | Wheelie Good Fun

Author:
Chris Hyde
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Mario Kart 8, Nintendo, Racing Games, Wii U games

Mario Kart 8 Review | Wheelie Good Fun

Many of Nintendo's best-known franchises have been running for nearly thirty years, a fact that not only cements such series into gaming history, but also raises a growing level of anxiety with each new iteration. After all, how long can you keep on going with the same game, and keep things fresh and exciting for everyone? A question that is currently being asked squarely of the Mario Kart franchise thanks to the game's titular 8th iteration being released on Wii U.

How well Nintendo has done in this challenging balancing act is what matters to fans and newcomers alike, so without further ado, let's delve under the bonnet of the latest instalment of crazy racing with everyone's favourite portly plumber and his chums to see what the Big N has pulled off.

The first obvious point to note, is that gameplay-wise very little has been changed to the formula that has worked so well for over 20 years.  Frankly, this familiarity is what piques our interest about all new Mario Karts in the first instance. We know what we like, and it's the good quality fun that a Mario Kart game provides, and Mario Kart 8 most definitely delivers here thanks to this familiarity. However, it's the new additions, improvements and longevity that are going to convert the naysayers of the game and the Wii U (I'm looking at you Matt). So what does Mario Kart 8 bring that's new and shiny to the party?

Mario Kart 8 Review | Wheelie Good Fun

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Murdered: Soul Suspect Review | Valar Morghulis

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Adventure Games, Airtight Games, Murdered: Soul Suspect, Mystery games, PS4 games, Square Enix

Murdered: Soul Suspect Review | Valar Morghulis

As high concepts go, Murdered: Soul Suspect has one of the best. It's like a mashup of Ghost Trick and L.A. Noire -- a modern adventure game that has you step into the ethereal shoes of recently deceased detective Ronan O'Connor, picking apart crime scene after crime scene in the pursuit of clues to help him track down the mass murderer who threw him out of a fourth floor window and turned Ronan into a ghost.

It's like Randall and Hopkirk, but without Randall.

Being a ghost, of course, Ronan can't pick anything up, he can't punch anyone's lights out like he used to as a maverick cop with a chequered past. He can't fire a gun or slice with a blade. Hell, he can't even enter a building unless someone's left a door open. What this leads to is a game that handles like a third-person action title in many ways, but is pretty much bereft of direct violence. Ronan is no longer a character who slugs his way to get results, now he has to be a bit more observant.

Murdered: Soul Suspect Review | Valar Morghulis

It means that Murdered's setup shares much in common with classic mystery titles, point-and-click adventures, and hidden object games. Like L.A. Noire, much of the player's time is spent combing crime scenes for clues, scouring environments for interactive objects, and trying to discern what's important from what isn't. It does that for about ten hours -- sometimes that gets a little tedious.

In terms of mechanics, there's not much to Murdered. You traipse around towns and asylums and wooded glades, pressing a single button when you find something worthy of note, trying to piece together what happened. But there are some good ideas here: the profiling mechanism that has you looking at half-formed scenes to try and determine the actions and motives of those involved really allows you to immerse yourself in the role of detective, as does invading the mind of a witness and trying to find the right combination of information snapshots to trigger the memory you want to access. You don't necessarily need to find all of the clues in an area to progress, just enough to piece together the narrative to a satisfactory extent, and the game never really gets in the way of you moving on.

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WildStar Review | Part 1 – Initial Impressions

Author:
Carl Phillips
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Carbine Studios, Games reviews, MMORPGs, NCsoft, WildStar

WildStar Review | Part 1 – Initial Impressions
Platform: PC

Developer: Carbine Studios

Publisher: NCSOFT

Well, here we are. After nearly three years of following the project it’s a little weird to be saying that the game is finally live, but myself and many others have taken to Nexus like a swarm of Chompacabras, ready to eat up whatever Carbine have been cooking. Before we kick this off, some housekeeping – because of the size and scope of MMOs, and the wide range of content available in this one specifically, WildStar will be reviewed in instalments that cover different aspects of the game, with a finale in a few weeks’ time that will deliver my overall verdict. I’ll be providing a “summary so far” at the end of each part, but be aware this is a huge effort, because it’s a huge game.

Or, alternatively, just throw all blame at Matt. Because.

Anyway, enough of that – let’s summarise what Carbine’s MMO is all about for the three of you that have ignored my coverage of it up until now (you swines.) WildStar is a sci-fi MMORPG where two factions – the oppressive empire of the Dominion, and the ragtag group of rebels that are the Exiles – vie for control of a newly found planet called Nexus. Both groups are there because it is believed to be the home planet of the Eldan, a hyper-advanced race that hasn’t been seen in a millennia, and it’s up to the players to tame the wilds of Nexus to forge a new home, fight for the honour of their chosen faction, and discover the reason why the Eldan aren’t around anymore (spoiler alert – bad things happened, and you’ll eventually go head-to-head with that badness.)

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Worms Battlegrounds Review | Clan Wars Too

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Artillery games, Games reviews, PS4 games, Team 17, Xbox One Games

Worms Battlegrounds Review | Clan Wars Too

Platforms: PS4 | Xbox One (£19.99, reviewed)

Developer: Team 17

Publisher: Team 17 Digital Limited

Worms Battlegrounds is Worms Clan Wars. The name may be different, but this PS4 and Xbox One port is identical to last year's PC release in absolutely every respect. Six months into a new console generation and we're still paying good money for old rope.

However, you could argue that we've been doing that since 1997. Team 17 created the perfect hotswap multiplayer formula in Worms 2 -- deep yet accessible mechanics, crisp eyecatching art style, amazing weapons, exploding livestock and anarchic British humour -- meaning that all future games could do was add or remove content, slightly tweak features and occasionally pretty things up for new platforms. From the magnificent Worms Armageddon to the skinny downloadable and mobile sequels, we've been stuck in that cycle ever since.

Worms Battlegrounds Review | Clan Wars Too

And that's fine. Worms is a timeless gaming institution that we want to keep playing on the consoles we own with improved visuals. I don't take issue with Clan Wars making the jump to new-gen machines, since compensating for bazooka windage, deploying sheep and humiliating our mates is just as fantastic fun as it ever was.

What I do take issue with, however, is the fact that Team 17 had the opportunity to fix several flaws and add extra value to their year-old game... but couldn't be bothered.

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Inazuma Eleven GO: Light & Shadow Review | Football Crazy!

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
3DS Games, Football games, Games reviews, JRPG, Level 5, Management games, Nintendo

Inazuma Eleven GO: Light & Shadow Review | Football Crazy!

Platform: 3DS

Developer: Level-5

Publisher: Nintendo

Inazuma Eleven is still one of my favourite gameplay concepts of all time. It's one of those JRPGs based around a specific thing; Pokemon or plastic spinning tops or demons or whatnot, starring an intense youngster who's totally obsessed with tactical battling, outrageous special attacks, collecting loot and becoming the very best like no-one ever was. Except, instead of pulling out a sword or Pokeball, you'll throw down a couple of jumpers and get involved in a game of five-a-side.

Only with strategic real-time action and the ability to pull off ludicrous power moves that set the ball on fire or summon massive monsters onto the pitch! Now that the DS trilogy has come to an end, it's time for the 3DS sequel to... kick things up a notch? Oof.

Football is everything in Inazuma Eleven GO; a way of life, the combat system, the entire driving force behind the plot. High school football is apparently the most important sporting event in the entire world, yet ten years after Raimon High rose to prominence as the ultimate soccer academy, things have gone horribly wrong. A massive conspiracy has taken over the sport and rigs every match, effectively dominating the entire world in the process. So it's up to freshman Arion Sherwind to lead a revolution and bring sportsmanship back to the beautiful game, making a new Raimon team while meeting some old faces.

It's silly, ludicrous, hilariously hammy and impossible to take seriously, but Inazuma Eleven GO embraces its silliness so earnestly that you can't help but get swept along for the ride. You won't be able to keep a straight face as Arion shouts "I'm going to defend football! I won't make football sad!," and that's absolutely fine.

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Hyperdimension Neptunia: Producing Perfection Review | Idle M@ster

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Compile Heart, Management games, NIS America Europe, Parody games, PS Vita games, Reef Entertainment, Visual novel

Hyperdimension Neptunia: Producing Perfection Review | Idle M@ster

Platform: PS Vita

Developer: Compile Heart

Publisher: NIS America | Reef Entertainment

Hyperdimension Neptunia: Producing Perfection is an idol videogame parody spin-off of a parody JRPG based on videogames. It's Parodyception!

And it's a decent parody too. The world of Gamindustri -- yes, that's the sort of level we're at here folks -- is ruled over by godesses who cheekily personify a real-life console manufacturer. From the impulsive and brash Noire who runs Lastation (geddit?) to the adorable DS twins, everyone and everything is based around obvious and occasionally hilarious satire of this cut-throat industry.

My personal favourite 'CPU' would have to be the arrogant feature-obsessed Vert, who considers herself to be older and wiser than all her fellows, while occasionally suggesting handing out free hardware at PR events. She wears green and presides over the Leanbox region. See if you can guess what console manufacturer she represents!

Hyperdimension Neptunia: Producing Perfection Review | Idle M@ster

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Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
PC games, PS3 games, PS4 games, Sandbox games, Ubisoft Montreal, Ubisoft Reflections, Watch Dogs, Xbox 360 games

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Platforms: PC | PS3 | PS4 | Xbox 360 | Xbox One (reviewed)

Developer: Ubisoft MontrealUbisoft Reflections

Publisher: Ubisoft

Watch Dogs has its moments.

Interconnected future Chicago is a hacker's playground. You'll infiltrate heavily guarded compounds without even setting foot in the building, leaping between CCTV cameras like a digital ghost. You'll turn car chases into carnage as you detonate sub-street steam pipes and raise bridges, speeding away from pile-ups that would make Elwood Blues doff his fedora. Vindictive players will terrorise panicking criminals by remotely sending them threatening texts and arming their grenades, an unseen terror who eventually sneaks in to mop up stragglers with a baton and silenced pistol.

When its hacking, gunplay, stealth and driving come together, the result is pure water cooler magic.

Unfortunately these moments are wrapped in an open-world game that's arguably too big, flabby and formulaic for its own good, but they still make Watch Dogs well worth playing.

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SQUIDS Odyssey Review | Super Squid Squad

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Artillery games, Games reviews, Nintendo, Strategy games, The Game Bakers, Wii U games

SQUIDS Odyssey Review | Super Squid Squad

Platform: Wii U (eShop, £9.99)

Developer: The Game Bakers

Hello SQUIDS. We meet again. I've been waiting for this day.

See, I last encountered the colourful lovechild of turn-based strategy, pool and Angry Birds back in 2011 during my stint at our mobile sister site Mobot.net. It let us lead squads of stretchy squid into battle in tense battles, but replaced traditional battle systems with trick-shot catapult combat as our squishy soldiers careened around the battlefield and slammed into foes. Praising its big ambitions and tiny price tag, I awarded the original iOS game a perfect score and suggested that it would make a superb handheld or home console title with extra content and polish.

The Game Bakers certainly took their sweet time, but three years and a sequel later, the complete SQUIDS experience has been gussied-up, blown out and delivered onto the Wii U eShop, with a 3DS version in the pipeline.

It's a perfect fit for both platforms and just as fun as ever. But can a mobile title, even an expanded one, survive in the open seas of a new ecosystem?

SQUIDS Odyssey Review | Super Squid Squad

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The Incredible Adventures Of Van Helsing II Review | Lives Up To Its Name

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
ARPG, Dungeon crawler, Games reviews, Indie Games, Loot grinder, Neocore Games, PC games

The Incredible Adventures Of Van Helsing II Review | Lives Up To Its Name

Platforms: PC (£11.99)

Developer: Neocore Games

The Incredible Adventures Of Van Helsing is a guilty pleasure and a great idea. It's a full-fat Action RPG delivered in three meaty parts costing £11.99 apiece, but packing the personality of a rambunctious B-Movie adventure. The floppy hatted hunter rampages through a bestiary of classic movie monsters and mad science experiments, swapping banter and gear with his sarcastic yet faithful companion Lady Katarina. It's a hoot, a real honest-to-goodness rollicking romp that doesn't take itself seriously, yet delivers solid Diablo-esque shenanigans for less than the price of Blizzard's expansion pack.

After seeing a great deal of potential in the first game, my faith was rewarded by a host of post-launch updates that added massive replayability and new features into the package, after which NeoCore set to creating a sequel with much more ambition. They succeeded. Barring a few bugs and some questionable writing, The Incredible Adventures Of Van Helsing 2 punches well above its weight and ends up as a markedly superior game.

The Incredible Adventures Of Van Helsing II Review | Lives Up To Its Name

Seriously, even the optional tower defence sections are good enough to be a standalone game in their own right. Let alone the 12-15 hours of slaughtering supernatural beasties wrapped around them!

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The Wolf Among Us: Episode 4 - In Sheep's Clothing Review | A Tad Woolly

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Adventure Games, iOS games, PC games, PS3 games, Telltale Games, The Wolf Among Us, Xbox 360 games

The Wolf Among Us: Episode 4 - In Sheep's Clothing Review | A Tad Woolly

Platforms: PCPSNXBLA

Developer: Telltale Games

It's difficult to write a review with clenched fists and white knuckles. I keep catching sight of my dilated pupils and sweat-drenched brow in my monitor's reflection, bashing away at the keyboard with gritted teeth.

See, The Wolf Among Us: Episode 4 psyched me up for a fight using every psychological weapon in its arsenal... then completely failed to deliver one.

Of course, that's what it was always supposed to do. The penultimate episode of Telltale's excellent series is designed to set up the finale, tie up some loose ends and get us ready for the big finish, and I appreciate that. Unfortunately it does so by treading water and vaguely floating sideways when all we really want to do is push forward.

Before we begin: be aware that I'm not going to spoil the big twists from Episode 1, 2 and 3 - and I assume that you're already au fait with the premise.

The Wolf Among Us: Episode 4 - In Sheep's Clothing Review | A Tad Woolly

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Wolfenstein: The New Order Review | New Looks, Old-School Spirit

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Bethesda Softworks, FPS games, MachineGames, PC games, PS4 games, Wolfenstein: The New Order, Xbox One Games

Wolfenstein: The New Order Review | New Looks, Old-School Spirit

If we had a scale to measure a sort of "grin-inducement factor", Wolfenstein: The New Order would frequently be maxing it out, much of which has to do with the merry gusto with which MachineGames have gone about their business.

It's a shooter that remembers what dual-wielding automatic shotguns is actually all about: a feeling of hysterical power, frequently followed by breathless silence as you empty yourself of all ammo and take a look at the carnage you've wrought as the smoke clears. It's a game that understands the attraction of stealth even when you're bristling with guns, and the importance of making every takedown and knife throw satisfying in accomplishment, and deliciously rewarding in terms of feedback. It's a game that reimplements the FPS lean mechanism when the brightest modern staples have abandoned it.

It might be my favourite throwaway FPS campaign since Singularity.

Our bull-necked hero, William "B.J." Blazkowicz, kicks things off by smashing an Allied assault into the walls of the Nazi General Deathshead's fortress of nightmares. The year is 1946. The assault doesn't quite go to plan, and a spot of bother leads to Blazkowicz spending the next fourteen years in an asylum having been catatonic for almost a decade and a half. In that time, however, the Nazis have won the war thanks to a bunch of giant robots and laser cannons, the Allies have surrendered, and just as Blazkowicz begins to recognise the world around him once more, a bunch of Nazi troops swarm the asylum, start killing the patients and the owners, and our gravelly-voice protagonist has to blast his way out, pausing to save his nurse on the way.

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Soul Sacrifice Delta Review | Soul Mates?

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Action RPGs, Comcept, Games reviews, Keiji Inafune, PS Vita games, SCEE, Sony Japan Studio

Soul Sacrifice Delta Review | Soul Mates?

Platform: PS Vita (PSN, £23.99)

Developer: Comcept

Publisher: SCEE

Reviewing Soul Sacrifice Delta is like getting back with an ex. We were so good together during our intense love affair last year, even if things eventually fizzled after a few heady months. For the life of me I can't remember why we split up in the first place.

We've fallen straight back into our old routine: killing monsters in compact arenas with a diverse selection of spells and abilities. Soul Sacrifice condenses the monster hunting gameplay of... well, Monster Hunter... into a more straightforward and muscular format, with pick-up-and-play brawls against hordes of demonic fiends and enormous bosses; each boasting their own unique attacks, themes and tragic backstories. It's a compelling mix of twitchy hack & slash action with a focus on ranged spells and summons, constantly challenging players to make tough choices in the heat of battle as foes press the advantage.

Soul Sacrifice Delta Review | Soul Mates?

Do you sacrifice an enemy to gain more spell power? Do you sacrifice your own skin for more damage? Will you sacrifice your friends to win a tough engagement? The core remains the same mix of punishment and progression, constantly evolving your playstyle, tweaking builds, crushing through a wealth of content and eventually becoming powerful enough to beat the final adversary, and we get along just as well as when when Brendan reviewed it last May.

Seriously, though, why did we split up? It must have been important. I'm sure it'll come to me as I lie in this filthy maggot-encrusted cage.

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Daylight Review | Grudging Through Another No-Flair Witch Project

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Daylight, Horror games, PC games, PS4 games, Survival Horror Games

Daylight Review | Grudging Through Another No-Flair Witch Project

Platforms: PS4 (reviewed) | PC

Developer: Zombie Studios

Publisher: Atlus

Horror games have seen something of a resurgence in recent years on the PC platform, while the genre has slowly bled out on the consoles. But with the renewed indie focus on the PS4, perhaps the things that lie in the shadows and lurk under our beds are set to make a return.

Recent PS Plus freebie Outlast may have been a repetitive effort, but there was no denying that its first-person viewpoint, jumpy moments and sickeningly foreboding atmosphere were excellently put together. You’d certainly be forgiven for confusing it with today’s game, Daylight. Hell, until this arrived on my desk, I’d mentally absorbed it into the same game as Outlast. However, despite the hospital setting and first-person perspective, this is a very different game. And not in a good way.

Daylight Review | Grudging Through Another No-Flair Witch Project

You play as a woman that wakes up in an abandoned asylum with only a mobile phone and a lack of memory to go on with. The phone occasionally rattles out strange voicemails from who we presume is responsible for dumping her there. That’s about as much premise as you get.

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Always Sometimes Monsters Review | Monstrous Regimen

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Always Sometimes Monsters, Devolver Digital, Indie Games, PC games, Vagabond Dog

Always Sometimes Monsters Review | Monstrous Regimen

Always Sometimes Monsters is a game that's all about choice. Sometimes that means deciding whether or not to give that bag of super-potent drugs in your pocket to your rehabbing junkie best mate just so he can calm down before his own gig. Sometimes it means choosing between a job at an ad agency or a local newspaper. Sometimes it means letting someone lose their life so you can keep yours. Sometimes it means betraying a friend and cutting them out of your life so you can be with the person you desire.

Sometimes it means becoming the lesser of two evils. Sometimes it means being a monster.

Always Sometimes Monsters is a slow-paced affair. It's a Game Maker RPG without any combat systems or incessant inventory management. It's not concerned with your tactical thinking or your capacity for grinding. It just wants to know how far you'll go to get what, or rather who, you want.

Always Sometimes Monsters Review | Monstrous Regimen

Always Sometimes Monsters opens with a very brief prologue stuffed with metafictional waffle. Get past that, though, and you'll find yourself at a party, taking control of Larry, a publisher getting ready to sign you up to a lucrative book deal. By steering Larry around a soiree held at his mini mansion, you're charged with actually identifying your own character from the throng of assembled guests. Will you be male or female? White? Black? Asian? A grungy old soul or a trendy hipster? You decide by interacting with the person you'd like to form the centre of this tale, after which control passes to the person you've chosen to be your protagonist, and you move outside to identify the love of your life from an equally diverse array of characters.

I like the fact that Always Sometimes Monsters doesn't make a fuss about any of this, it doesn't ask for your personal details, it just fills in the blanks via simple gameplay.

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Transistor Review | Bastion's Cool Cousin Aims For The Head, Not The Heart

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Action Games, Action RPG, Editor's Choice, Indie Games, PC games, PS4 games, Supergiant Games

Transistor Review | Bastion's Cool Cousin Aims For The Head, Not The Heart

Platform: PC (reviewed) | PS4

Developer: Supergiant Games

"But is it better than Bastion?" The Big Question looms large over Transistor even though it's total nonsense: the two games couldn't be more different if they tried.

That said, the superficial similarities are overwhelming. My most anticipated game of 2014 is another tightly-paced isometric action RPG that throws cyberpunk singer Red and her friend-turned-superweapon into arena battles against a menacing digital army. Supergiant once again bring Logan Cunningham's honey-voiced narration, sumptuous art direction and superb sound design to bear with ruthless efficiency, creating the achingly gorgeous yet haunting world of Cloudbank around us and spinning a fascinating yarn as it does so.

But whereas Bastion was built around reflexes and powerful emotions, Transistor is cool as a cucumber: a slick, stylish and tactical experience that rewards using your head, not your heart. Victory comes down to forward planning and perfect execution, taking full advantage of a dizzying range of versatile abilities and a game-changing combat mechanic that blends strategic turn-based action with visceral swordplay.

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Mugen Souls Z Review | Moe Madness, Love Beams & Tentacles - Just Another Compile Heart JRPG, Then

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Compile Heart, JRPG, NIS America, PS3 games, Reef Entertainment

Mugen Souls Z Review | Moe Madness, Love Beams & Tentacles - Just Another Compile Heart JRPG, Then

Platform: PS3

Developer: Compile Heart

Publisher: NIS America | Reef Entertainment

"LOVE MEEEEEEE," Mugen Souls Z seems to scream. "I'm quirky and cute and colourful and moe as hell and there are huge robots and tentacles and sometimes the girls flash their knickers. What more do you want?!!"

I could have just described any Compile Heart game, in fairness. The masters of the delightfully-bizarre-yet-never-particularly-brilliant JRPG always stuff their offerings full of cute scantily (pantily?) clad ladies, cheeky cheesecake galore, crazy gameplay systems and violently colourful art direction - and I can't help but love them for it even as I bring down the critical hammer. Irrepressible personality and gorgeous anime artwork can make a good game great and a mediocre one interesting, but it can't make a bad game worth buying.

Mugen Souls Z Review | Moe Madness, Love Beams & Tentacles - Just Another Compile Heart JRPG, Then

Such as we saw with the original Mugen Souls. A vain goddess tried to win over an entire solar system by making it fall in love with her -- inanimate objects, landmasses and all -- by assuming a variety of dated female character tropes to cater to specific anime fetishes. Unfortunately the quirky veneer gradually cracked to reveal a grindy and annoyingly obtuse JRPG. As much as I love all things anime, there was no disguising the rubbish game buried beneath all the crazy.

Thankfully, Mugen Souls Z is a much better game in almost every respect!

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