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Origin Now Offers 24-Hour Refunds On EA Games

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
News
Tags:
Digital Distribution, EA, Origin, PC games, Refunds

Origin Now Offers 24-Hour Refunds On EA Games

EA: "We've Got Your Back"

If you buy an EA game from Origin and quickly realise that you hate it, you can now get your money back quibble-free within the first 24 hours.

Origin's new refund service is designed to reflect the good ol' days of game returns. If you don't like an EA title for any reason, you can request a refund in the first 24 hours after you start playing. Conversely, if you buy a game on impulse and realise that you didn't really want it and won't have time to play it, you can get your money back within a week of purchase (so long as you haven't booted it up).

"If something doesn't work out - you aren't riveted by the storyline, or sucked in by the action, or even just if the game doesn't play well with your video card - we've got your back," explains the official Origin blog.

"Requesting a refund is quick and easy. Just visit your order history and click the 'request a refund' link next to your recent purchase, answer a few quick questions, and we'll take it from there."

Digital refunds have become a somewhat thorny issue over the last couple of years, mainly down to Steam's somewhat draconian stance on the subject in the wake of incomplete releases like The War Z. As part of a mission to clean up their act, Origin and EA are the first digital distributor to offer the service, and frankly deserve to be congratulated for the move. Perhaps they learned some harsh lessons from SimCity's launch?

Whatever the reasons, Origin has now handily got one over on Steam. Your move, Valve.

Add a comment2 comments
Realhoneyman  Aug. 20, 2013 at 10:23

First the Origin Humble Bundle and now this? Either all this good will is a result of the reappointing of the CEO at EA or swift moves are being made to generate good PR for the company.

In either case, the customers win and consequently EA wins. Sometimes everyone can be happy. Sometimes.

Last edited by Realhoneyman, Aug. 20, 2013 at 10:24
JonLester  Aug. 20, 2013 at 10:30

In either case, the customers win and consequently EA wins. Sometimes everyone can be happy. Sometimes.


I agree - the means more than justify the ends here. Or something.

Either way, this is great news and seriously progressive stuff.

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