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PS Vita Homebrew Hack Is "100% Against Piracy"

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
News
Tags:
hacker, homebrew

PS Vita Homebrew Hack Is "100% Against Piracy"

But Could Be Used As A "Stepping Stone"

Yesterday, we reported that an enterprising developer was working on a homebrew loader for the PS Vita. In a new interview, Yifan Lu was keen to stress that all of the coders involved are absolutely against the idea of piracy, and the prerequisite kernal exploit designed to properly pirate games would be incredibly difficult to create.

Lu clarified that the Usermode Vita Loader can't be used to boot pirated Vita titles, explaining that it's "physically impossible to decrypt or load retail games with my exploit" on Twitter.

The developer restated his position to PlayStation Lifestyle, declaring that he's "100% against piracy and no tool I will make will benefit piracy. This tool, in fact, cannot be used for loading backups/pirated content even if I want to because of the physical limitations of the exploit (it is userland, no rights to decrypt/load games).”

When and if the Usermode Vita Loader enters the public domain (code is already available on Github), it could theoretically be used as a launchpad to try and crack the Vita's kernel. Theoretically - not probably - being the operative word.

"It could be used as a stepping stone to analyze the system for farther exploits, including the more desirable kernel exploit, which if found would open the system up entirely (mods, CFW, maybe even Linux/Android, and unfortunately ISO loaders).”

“However, it takes a lot of skills to find such an exploit,” Lu added, “and those who I talked to with the necessary skills are all anti-piracy. However, not thinking of potential other exploits, this one can only be used to load homebrews and nothing else…Sony’s system is really well designed and I believe a kernel exploit is very far away.”

The Usermode Vita Loader is still in the earliest stages, with Lu seeking assistance for what is currently still "a few lines of code." A demo version will likely take "a couple of months" to complete, potentially opening up the console to homebrew applications and development.

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