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Rumour: PlayStation 4 To Support 4K Resolution?

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
News
Tags:
4K, PS4, Resolution, Rumour, Sony

Rumour: PlayStation 4 To Support 4K Resolution?

The latest next-gen rumour purports that Sony's next PlayStation console will support 'ultra HD' 4K resolution playback, so named for its horizontal resolution of c. 4000 pixels. According to a report on BGR, Sony's range of 4K Blu-Ray players and upcoming 80 inch XBR television (3096 x 3072) is the first step in popularising the resolution standard, which will be followed by the next PlayStation offering an affordable alternative (a realistic maximum of 4096×1714 for widescreen televisions).

If you can afford a big enough telly and love to brag about big numbers, this will likely be music to your ears.

Add a comment17 comments
hurrakan  Aug. 23, 2012 at 12:01

N.F.G.E. :)

The BBC are recommending that everyone skip 4K and go straight to 8K. They say that "8K is the maximum the human eye can understand (…) it's the end of the resolution story".

"As far as he's concerned (BBC's project head, Tim Plyming), anyone investing in 4K may as well go right to the end of the track and put their money in 8K instead."

http://www.engadget.com/2012/07/31/super-hi-vision-eyes-on/

Last edited by hurrakan, Aug. 23, 2012 at 12:02
DivideByZero  Aug. 23, 2012 at 13:20

All well and good supporting 4k (or even 8k) but if ALL YOUR GAMES RUN AT 720P AND 30FPS THEY WILL STILL LOOK PANTS.

Rant over.

DivideByZero  Aug. 23, 2012 at 13:22

Also, early tests of 4k showed that it gave a lot of people motion sickness. I personally can't wait! Wonder how long till those TVs come out?

Quietus  Aug. 23, 2012 at 13:30

It was one of the things I found amusing when the whole 'WHOA, FULL HD TV' thing hit. I often thought to myself that PC monitors had been doing it (and more) for years, and what was stopping them just launching the Super HD straight afterward? Clearly, nothing is.

DivideByZero  Aug. 23, 2012 at 14:00

That's not strictly true.

While you could knock out a TV that has a 4k screen, what would you watch at 4k?

Blu Rays are pretty full with one HD film (I believe) and so the thought of sticking a film on some form of playable media becomes difficult.

Also, to watch live TV you would need so much bandwidth, the UK just couldn't cope.

The only really viable use of this would be games I guess (and PC as you could download a 2tb movie over a few days and watch over a few minutes).

Trouble is, if a console supports this res, it needs to have enough grunt to support it well.

Anarchist  Aug. 23, 2012 at 14:37

Don't really see the need. Yet. Other than manufacturers having another gimmick to sponge some money off people with too much.

Most people don't notice the difference between 720p and 1080p, let alone anything higher.

hurrakan  Aug. 23, 2012 at 14:59

Also, early tests of 4k showed that it gave a lot of people motion sickness. I personally can't wait! Wonder how long till those TVs come out?

Next month:
http://www.engadget.com/2012/08/22/lg-4k-84-inch-uhdtv/
http://flatpanelshd.com/news.php?subaction=showfull&id=1345616169
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19344834

DivideByZero  Aug. 23, 2012 at 15:49

Meh.

Having 4k on an 84" is like having big boobs on a fat chick.

Give me 4k on a 55" and then I am in.

You can get 22" 1080p screens and they look super sharp. I have a 55" 1080p and while it looks sharp, it's not even close to a 22" screen with the same resolution.

Thanks muchly for the heads up though, that one had sailed right past me.

DivideByZero  Aug. 23, 2012 at 15:51

Most people don't notice the difference between 720p and 1080p


I do, and it annoys me when people say they can't see it. It is highly noticeable to me and I honestly don't get hope people can't see it. Kinda wish i didn't too.

Anarchist  Aug. 23, 2012 at 18:25

Most people don't notice the difference between 720p and 1080p


I do, and it annoys me when people say they can't see it. It is highly noticeable to me and I honestly don't get hope people can't see it. Kinda wish i didn't too.


It annoys me when people say they can see it. Yeah, check how clever you are, able to make comments on the Internet about how great you are that nobody can confirm.

...

I have a mate who claimed the exact same thing. Then I switched his PS3 to 720p when he went to the toilet. The only reason he figured it out was because all the icons on his dashboard were larger. He had no idea while playing GT5 or watching his kill bill blu ray.

DivideByZero  Aug. 24, 2012 at 10:32

Good for you genius. I can see it and it bothers me.

Even on the PC I notice it. To the point where I have pointed out issues in other peoples setups (TV and PC).

Some people are more than happy to watch dodgy downloaded rips of films... I really struggle, I spend more time looking at the artifacts and whats wrong with the picture so I don't. But almost everyone I know says it doesn't bother them.

Some people even say they can't notice any difference between DVD and BD. To me, I just don't understand - they feel the same way though.

I have never played GT5 so can't comment on the graphics.

What size was the TV? I have a 55" TV that I sit about 6' away from.

So, at 720p at about 35" tall that's about 20 dpi
and at 1080p at about 35" tall that's about 30 dpi

Quite a big difference when you look at it like that.

Last edited by DivideByZero, Aug. 24, 2012 at 10:33
DivideByZero  Aug. 24, 2012 at 10:38

If you want to read about how you can see the difference between 720p and 1080p, this thread has a lot of useful info.

I just did a Google and it's the first result, but it covers off all the valid points about screen size, viewing distance and the fact that it is subjective to peoples eyes.

http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=166432

DivideByZero  Aug. 24, 2012 at 10:44

And here for a calculator:

http://www.hdhes.com/tv/hdtvviewdistance.aspx


Visual Acuity Learn more

Based on the common theory on the limits of human vision, to see all the detail an 1080p HDTV can produce at a viewing distance of 6', you will need a 49" HDTV.

Based on the more optimistic theory on the limits of human vision, to see all the detail an 1080p HDTV can produce at a viewing distance of 6', you will need a 24" HDTV.

-----------------------

So either way, my TV is big enough and I sit close enough to see the difference.

I agree that if you are sitting 10 foot away from a 32", you wont notice the difference. I don't like such a small screen myself.

Anarchist  Aug. 24, 2012 at 12:41

You sit 6' away from your 55" screen?

Sell it, and start saving up to move out of your council house. Winds me up when people with tiny council living rooms jam the biggest tv they can afford into it. It's like the Royle family all over again.

Last edited by Anarchist, Aug. 24, 2012 at 12:45
DivideByZero  Aug. 24, 2012 at 13:37

Well done on just sounding like an idiot.

If you care to actually look at the link I provided about viewing distance you would see that your opinions are not based on fact.

Also, I own my own house and I have quite a lot of savings thank you very much Trollboy.

--------------------------


Based on your responses, which were:

- You would like to have the highest resolution and best viewing experience possible.
- The primary viewing distance will be 6 feet.
- You will place the HDTV on a stand.

The solution presented for you is based on THX guidelines for HDTV setup. The THX guidelines recommend a seating distance and accompanying screen size that allows the viewer to see all available detail produced by the display, thus providing an immersive experience, while limiting the viewer from seeing any pixel related artefacts. Alternatively you could choose to follow the recommendation of SMPTE, which is presented further down the page.
THX Standards Learn more

The HDTV resolution that best matches your goal is 1080p.

The optimum HDTV size is 61".

Your minimum recomended HDTV size is 42".

----------------


Visual Acuity Learn more

Based on the common theory on the limits of human vision, to see all the detail an 1080p HDTV can produce at a viewing distance of 6', you will need a 49" HDTV.

Based on the more optimistic theory on the limits of human vision, to see all the detail an 1080p HDTV can produce at a viewing distance of 6', you will need a 24" HDTV.
SMPTE Standards Learn more

The minimum recommended HDTV size is 45".
Standard Retail Recomendations Learn more

The recommended HDTV size is 29".

Anarchist  Aug. 24, 2012 at 13:42

Council house.

DivideByZero  Aug. 24, 2012 at 13:48

Private house.

Idiot.

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