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Sonic Generations

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Sonic Generations
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Sonic Generations 3DS Review | Attack Of The Clones

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
3DS Games, Dimps, Platform games, Platformers, Sega, Sonic, Sonic Generations
Discuss:
Sonic Generations | Nintendo 3DS

Sonic Generations 3DS Review | Attack Of The Clones

Platform: 3DS

Developer: Dimps

Publisher: SEGA

If you've read Brendan's Sonic Generations console review, then you'll know that this celebration of twenty years of Sonic sees Dr. Eggman and the nefarious Time Eater diddling with dimensions so engineer a situation where 'classic' Sonic bumps into his modern counterpart. Once again we see an array of old and new levels rendered in classic 2D form - although now with impressive stereoscopic 3D visuals.

Things are pleasantly distinct at first, with classic Sonic restricted to just his trusty spin dash, while modern Sonic enjoys the benefits of the speed boost, enemy-felling skids and, of course, his characteristic homing attack. It's also worth noting that this is the first game for the 3DS that I've played where the game looks significantly better with the 3D slider set to 'Ultimate Migraine'. Not only is it bearable, but the stages come to life like never before, the sub-standard graphics plainly visible in 2D, suddenly look far more striking once they have an extra dimension.

Sonic Generations 3DS Review | Attack Of The Clones

I played the console version and loved it, but those looking for a replication of that game on the 3DS may well be disappointed. In spite of sharing the same title, this version plays quite a bit differently than its larger counterpart and that's actually something of a shame. You see, some of the best levels are missing. Yes, we get Casino Night from Sonic 2, but there's no City Escape. Emerald Coast is a welcome addition, but there are two fewer levels in this portable iteration, and the first three are identical replicas of their respective Mega Drive originals. Given free rein to 'classicise' the Dreamcast and modern HD levels, though, Dimps have opted to insert a whole bunch of cheap insta-fail pits and death traps that Sonic will quite merrily plunge headfirst into with very little warning. Sometimes it's challenging, often it's simply cheap.

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Sonic Generations Review | Double Trouble?

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Games reviews, Platformers, Sega, Sonic Generations
Discuss:
Sonic Generations | Playstation 3 | Xbox 360

Sonic Generations Review | Double Trouble?

Platforms: PS3 (reviewed) | 360 | PC
Developer: SEGA
Publisher: SEGA

Aiming to please fans of both traditional and modern Sonic titles, Sega have included both styles in one game. Surprisingly this hasn’t resulted in the partial disaster I expected. But is Sonic still capable of a decent result in a genre that has unfortunately all but faded?

We find ourselves taking turns to play as the 2D side-scrolling scamp of old and the free-moving chatty rail-grinder. Time travel is the logic behind this merging of styles, as modern-day Sonic joins forces with his younger 1990s self. Together they must defeat Dr. Robotnik and Dr. Eggman, essentially two versions of the same villain. In addition to the fat moustachioed one(s), there’s a sinister creature that caused the time rift in the first place.

Sonic Generations Review | Double Trouble?

The cutscenes are basic, but manage to separate the two Sonics clearly enough. Old school Sonic is short and silent, and uses endearing motions. New Sonic is lanky with Final Fantasy hair and an annoying voice-over. New Sonic has one of his gang of crayon-chewing, reprobate, cheap toy-looking friends released after each zone. Knuckles and Tails were ok back in the day thanks to their abilities. But these chumps...roadkill in waiting.

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