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Sony: 300 GB Blu-Ray Successor To Release Before 2015

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
News
Tags:
Blu-ray, Panasonic, Sony

Sony: 300 GB Blu-Ray Successor To Release Before 2015

Sony and Panasonic have unveiled their plans for Blu-Ray's replacement: an optical disc that can hold at least 300GB gigabytes of data (six times more than the maximum capacity of a current Blu-Ray). The new storage medium will apparently roll out next year, primarily designed for 4K ultra-high-definition films and the movie market. [via the BBC]

Gaming applications haven't yet been discussed, though it's likely that Sony will look to beef up digital distribution going forward, at least until there's a sizeable 4K install base. We'll keep you posted.

Add a comment9 comments
DivideByZero  Jul. 30, 2013 at 15:17

Hummm....

Uncompressed 4K will run at 1.6TB / hour at 24fps.

So they are going to have to compress the hell out of 4K to get it to fit on 300GB.

I was expecting more from the next disk.

JonLester  Jul. 30, 2013 at 15:36

The 300GB figure is an absolute minimum, FYI.

Late  Jul. 30, 2013 at 15:55

[s]If uncompressed 4K runs at 1.6TB/hr does that mean 1080p should run at 100gb/hr* but is compressed down to 25/50gb to get on a BD then?
I'm not all that tech savvy, so not sure if that's how it works, but I'm suddenly intrigued...

Presumably you'd need over 200gb space on a disk to hold a full uncompressed 2hr film, then? That's not to criticise BD - I'm guessing most decent compression on that scale is effectively unnoticable to the average person; and I've noticed the difference between upscaled dvd and native bluray on some (but not all) films even on my 720p telly.

*(being a sixteenth - I'm assuming 4k has sixteen times the resolution of 1080p)[/s]



Ah - no strikethrough bbcode, then?

Last edited by Late, Jul. 30, 2013 at 16:50
Quietus  Jul. 30, 2013 at 16:08

Hehe, Blu-ray hasn't even taken over properly yet, with DVDs and their players still outnumbering them. Oh well. It's just as well that I don't buy DVDs and Blu-rays for just this reason.:)

Quietus  Jul. 30, 2013 at 16:11

*(being a sixteenth - I'm assuming 4k has sixteen times the resolution of 1080p)
Nope. It's four times - double length and double height. It's 3840x2160.

Edit: I should clarify that there are other variations as well, but that's the main one.

Last edited by Quietus, Jul. 30, 2013 at 16:13
Late  Jul. 30, 2013 at 16:48

So they've gone from counting horizontal lines as the primary, to counting vertical? Sneaky!

In that case let me revise my above post to:



If uncompressed 4K runs at 1.6TB/hr does that mean 1080p should run at 400gb/hr* but is compressed down to 25/50gb to get on a BD then?
I'm not all that tech savvy, so not sure if that's how it works, but I'm suddenly intrigued...

Presumably you'd need over 800gb space on a disk to hold a full uncompressed 2hr film, then? That's not to criticise BD - I'm guessing most decent compression on that scale is effectively unnoticable to the average person; and I've noticed the difference between upscaled dvd and native bluray on some (but not all) films even on my 720p telly.

*(being a quarter, using the revised assumption that 4k has four times the resolution of 1080p)

DivideByZero  Jul. 30, 2013 at 17:18

I suppose if the disk is 6 times bigger and the media on it is only 4 times bigger, it must work.

Though they need to sort the awful 24fps crap out.

Zeipher  Jul. 31, 2013 at 02:32

Will it require new hardware? Sorry if dumb question!

DivideByZero  Jul. 31, 2013 at 11:26

Almost certainly. Even if it is the same tech but with more layers, you would need a drive to read those additional layers.

With the advent of firmware updates on Blu Ray, we are closer to being able to update the device to what it can read, but I think this change is too fundamental to be patched in (you can't patch the laser!).

Besides, do you think they would miss a chance to sell us new drives?!

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