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Sony blasts EA's Xbox One subscription scheme as poor value

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
News
Tags:
EA, EA Access, Sony

Sony blasts EA's Xbox One subscription scheme as poor value

Handbags:ˈhan(d)bags. Noun, plural

  1. Small bags used to carry everyday personal items.
  2. a confrontation or squabble, typically involving videogame publishers, hardware manufacturers and fanboys

EA recently revealed the All Access Pass, an Xbox One-exclusive initiative that lets Xbox One owners pay £3.99 per month to freely access a selection of major titles. It's an interesting idea that will require some fine-tuning, not to mention a beefier collection of games, but could well become the norm when other publishers jump on the bandwagon (as we saw with Online Passes). We reckon that it's an early, potentially flawed yet intriguing glimpse at the future.

Sony, predictably, are having absolutely none of it.

"We evaluated the EA Access subscription offering and decided that it does not bring the kind of value PlayStation customers have come to expect," a Sony spokesperson told Game Informer. The key being that PlayStation Plus already includes access to the Instant Game Collection as part of a subscription.

"PlayStation Plus memberships are up more than 200 per cent since the launch of PlayStation 4, which shows that gamers are looking for memberships that offer a multitude of services, across various devices, for one low price.

"We don't think asking our fans to pay an additional $5 a month for this EA-specific program represents good value to the PlayStation gamer."

Handbags aside, there is arguably a point worth making here. PlayStation Plus' Instant Game Collection provides subscribers with a variety of downloadable titles from various publishers (first-and-third-parties alike), making the EA Access scheme much less relevant when compared to Microsoft's somewhat underwhelming Games With Gold promotion. Whether we'll see more third party publishers pull out of PS Plus to start up their own similar schemes on both consoles remains to be seen; how long before Ubisoft adds something similar to their Uplay platform?

Is £3.99 a month or £18.99 annually poor value or a worthwhile extra? Let us know how much you'd pay, and more importantly, what for!

Add a comment9 comments
MattGardner  Jul. 30, 2014 at 14:33

How long before Ubisoft adds something similar to their Uplay platform?


Dear gods no!

Uplay is f@#%$ng dreadful.

JonLester  Jul. 30, 2014 at 14:36

With little **** bells on.

And yet Ubi were quick enough to roll out 'Uplay Passports' when EA foisted online passes on us, weren't they?

roberttaylor8273  Jul. 30, 2014 at 15:13

Really sony, with the pricing for playstation now

Last edited by roberttaylor8273, Jul. 30, 2014 at 15:40
Late  Jul. 30, 2014 at 15:34

I wonder if this means EA titles will soon stop appearing on PS-Plus' roster.

stevenjameshyde  Jul. 30, 2014 at 16:18

I wonder if this means EA titles will soon stop appearing on PS-Plus' roster.

Crysis 3 is on next month, so obviously not that soon

Late  Jul. 30, 2014 at 16:43

I don't think things happen that quickly =))

Yeah, my "soon" was more of a "when their current commitments expire" - which I'd guess may be a few months.

dumbjam  Jul. 30, 2014 at 19:30

Considering that Madden 25 is still over £30, even second hand, this makes sense for me to buy the EA Access Pass instead of that. I only lose out on hard drive space and can add a week trial of the new games on top. Seems pretty good to me.

Anarchist  Jul. 31, 2014 at 00:26

Considering that Madden 25 is still over £30, even second hand, this makes sense for me to buy the EA Access Pass instead of that. I only lose out on hard drive space and can add a week trial of the new games on top. Seems pretty good to me.


Well that depends on if you were going to buy madden at £30 anyway. If you were, then yes, it's a good offer for you. If you weren't, then EA have got £20 out of you that they weren't going to get.

Dare I say it, this appears to me, to be EAs way of cashing in on the used game market. Instead of people picking up these games used a bit after launch, for a bit of a saving (and EA earning nothing), they can get them just as cheap through EA access, leaving EA quids in. I'll guarantee they've done their maths and they will definitely be making more money out of this service.

It is however, a far, far more friendly way of doing it than the old system of the one time use codes locking half the game, so preowned games were only able to access half the game without buying the code separately (forget what the industry term for these shenanigans was...!)

I still think its a good scheme. But not as good as it might first appear on the surface.

snotters  Jul. 31, 2014 at 10:59

Someone ought to say to Ubisoft "you be quiet"!

Eh? Ubi - "you be"? Nailed it!

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