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Bruce Grove

OnLive Will Be On Ouya At Launch

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
News
Tags:
Android, Bruce Grove, Cloud gaming, Human Element, OnLive, Ouya, Robert Bowling, Robotoki

OnLive Will Be On Ouya At Launch

OnLive has shacked up with Kickstarter smash hit Ouya, in a deal which will see the cloud gaming company bring its full service to the Ouya console at launch, including its impressive catalogue of games.

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OnLive On The Go | Tablet Impressions

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Android, Bruce Grove, Cloud gaming, iOS, iPad, OnLive, OnLive App, Tablets

OnLive On The Go | Tablet Impressions

I mentioned in my impressions piece for OnLive's UK launch that playing Deus Ex: Human Revolution on an iPad was a pretty gratifying experience for this gadget hound. Sat in a swanky MoreLondon office complex earlier this week, controller in hand, having Batman beat up some goons in Arkham City on a Samsung Galaxy tablet was pretty cool too. But deploying cannons with a touch of my finger in Defence Grid Gold on a Kindle Fire was even better.

OnLive on a tablet - Android only for the moment, with Apple still yet to give OnLive the green light (more on that in a bit) - is a cracking experience. The app is free, as is the copy of LEGO Batman that comes with it. Of the 25 titles that have so far been optimised for touch and gesture inputs, a handful of these - such as Defence Grid Gold and, excitingly, the upcoming debut of L.A. Noire on the service - have been further developed in conjunction with OnLive specifically for this purpose. What that means is that you get a bespoke touch interface designed by the developers themselves.

OnLive On The Go | Tablet Impressions

Elsewhere, as in the aforementioned LEGO Batman for example, there are V-pad overlays for control schemes that will be instantly familiar to anyone who has already dabbled in tablet gaming. The control setups are fairly standard, the screen restriction minimised wherever possible and Grove says that players will be able to customise their interface setups. The default overlay also changes from game to game, optimised through rigorous testing to match the needs for the game in question. That said, playing Darksiders on a Sony Tablet S with a touch interface was pretty horrible, the sheer number of virtual buttons proving rather overwhelming when you don't have the gamer's claw to fall back on. The touch interface does, however, mean that all of the budding artists who made the most of Duke Nukem Forever's whiteboard may have a reason to come back.

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