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This Attack on Titan Tribute Game is awesome, free, and the closest we'll get to a well-made tie-in

Author:
Carl Phillips
Category:
Features
Tags:
Action Games, Attack on Titan, Attack on Titan Tribute Game, Click To Play, Free, Unity Engine

This Attack on Titan Tribute Game is awesome, free, and the closest we'll get to a well-made tie-in

While we like to find the best deals on the latest games, because saving money is awesome, we also like to let you know when you can play something fantastic without spending a single penny. While this usually means Free-To-Play games like PlanetSide 2 (which is great, by the way) sometimes we come across complete experiences - artistic curios, or fun arcade-like titles - that are worthy of your attention.

Today, we look at one such freebie - the Attack on Titan Tribute Game.

As much as we at Dealspwn are happy that Attack on Titan: Humanity in Chains is finally hitting the Nintendo eShop later this month, a lot of the gameplay appears to be QTE-heavy. While the official tie-in might scratch the itch of fans that must wait until 2016 for season 2 of the show, I for one have been after something more substantial. After all, who doesn’t want to play a game where you get to fling yourself around at high-speed like something from Spider-man 2, slaying gigantic Titans as they try to grind you into pieces?

Well, there is something that does exactly that, and it’s the Attack on Titan Tribute Game. Best of all, it’s free and you can play it in your browser.

Click here to read more...

Still waiting for Star Citizen? Play its free official shoot'em up!

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
News
Tags:
Click To Play, Freebies, Star Citizen

Still waiting for Star Citizen? Play its free official shoot'em up!

Star Citizen still feels like a universe away, but the interminable wait might become a bit more bearable thanks to this fun little freebie. Roberts Space Industries has released a new free-to-play arcade shooter containing official ships-of-the-line, which you can enjoy in-browser.

There's even a fully fleshed-out instruction manual to peruse. Normally I'd take a little jab at Star Citizen still being months if not a year or more from release, and the allocation of resources towards fripperies like this, but Hyper Vanguard Force is actually pretty fun. Plus we'll take what we can get, frankly.

Platinum release 16-Bit Bayonetta for free - play now in browser

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Deals
Tags:
Bayonetta, Click To Play, Flash games, Free to play

Platinum release 16-Bit Bayonetta for free - play now in browser

How's your Monday going? Boring? Wish you were playing Bayonetta? Well Platinum Games have made your day by releasing a free Bayonetta flash game that you can play now in browser.

Just get ready to Alt-Tab wait isn't that your boss behind you right now? Sorry. Just testing your reflexes. You passed.

Thanks twinfinite and JP Kellams for the tip. Make sure to check out Matt's Bayonetta 2 review, and remember that you can buy Bayonetta 2 for £27.49 from Base!

Click To Play | The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, PC games, Text adventures, The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo

Click To Play | The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo

Welcome back to Click To Play , the new-old regular series that takes a look at a new browser-based curio each week to further the fine art of procrastination. We accept absolutely no responsibility if you get caught at work/school/uni/on the loo gloriously wasting time on the games listed here when you should be working.

This week: The Uncle who works for Nintendo

This week's offering -- "The Uncle who works for Nintendo" -- is a text-based horror game from programmer Michael Lutz and artist Kimberly Parker. It transports you back to primary school, and a video games-stuffed sleepover at your best friend's house. Thus follows an evening of gaming and chatting about everything and nothing, until midnight rolls around and a surprise guest turns up.

It's been touted as a horror game, but The Uncle who works for Nintendo is more of a creepy, unsettling thought piece. There are no jump scares to be found here, rather a twisting, psychologically-haunting tale that begs to be played through as soon as you've finished it. There are six endings to find, and numerous snippets of dialogue and narrative tidbits to uncover. It doesn't take long -- I'd found all of the endings in just over half an hour -- but it's important to replay the game several times as it's only through that repetition, and playing about with certain elements and options that the game's backstory reveals itself.

Click To Play | The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo

It's a game that manages to cultivate a spine-tingling atmosphere through some very well-worked sound design, too, along with some interesting uses of the Twine engine that underpins the game, occasionally breaking the fourth wall and making you think the thing's broken (it isn't). But the best thing about it is the way it renders the familiar scene of playing a game over at a friends house, and then carefully subverts the seemingly-innocuous comfort of that image more deeply with each subsequent playthrough. There are things in this game that will resonate with anyone who found themselves on the outside looking in, and themes and motifs that sparked my brain into considering things like addiction and inclusion and competition, and how the best of friends know how to hurt you the most.

I won't say any more, but you should give it a go. It's free, it's quick, and it might make you think. But definitely give it several playthroughs. It's more The Twilight Zone than The Walking Dead, but I found it to be astonishingly effective and affecting.

Click To Play | Transmission - Making Connections

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, Mobile games, PC games, Science Museum, Transmission

Click To Play | Transmission - Making Connections

Welcome back to Click To Play , the new-old regular series that takes a look at a new browser-based curio each week to further the fine art of procrastination. We accept absolutely no responsibility if you get caught at work/school/uni/on the loo gloriously wasting time on the games listed here when you should be working.

This week: Transmission

Educational games are nearly always rubbish, right? And yet, I've been playing Transmission -- a simple, elegant puzzler created by the British Science Museum to help teach people about the history of electronic communication -- for over an hour.

It starts off slowly, perhaps too slowly, really hammering home the objective of "light up of the boxes". Essentially, in each stage, you have to send little glowing data packets to little empty receiver boxes, dragging and dropping linear connections, and taking care not to cross the streams. It's very simple to begin with, but isn't too long before you end up with bonus objectives, jumbles of data nodes, and seemingly too few polygons of data for all of your receivers. Circles can transmit, squares cannot, filling little superscript stars can earn you bonuses, and so will ensuring you use the minimum number of transmissions.

Click To Play | Transmission - Making Connections

Click here to read more...

Click To Play | Assembots - Robo-Lemmings

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Assembots, Browser games, Click To Play, PC games

Click To Play | Assembots - Robo-Lemmings

Welcome back to Click To Play , the new-old regular series that takes a look at a new browser-based curio each week to further the fine art of procrastination. We accept absolutely no responsibility if you get caught at work/school/uni gloriously wasting time on the games listed here when you should be working.

This week: Assembots

Assembots is basically what you'd get if you crossed robots with Lemmings.

Each stage sees you attempting to guide a certain number of robots from one factory to the next and, just like the eponymous heroes of Lemmings, your mechanical chums in this will simply trundle forwards until you give them a new instruction or they hit a wall. The game eases you into things with a smattering of commands available from a horizontal array at the bottom of the screen, and to begin with you'll dig through dirt walls and platforms, climb walls, and turn into stationary pillars that can be used to activate switches and prevent robots from hurling themselves off of cliffs. You'll only have a limited number of these commands, however, so it's important to think carefully before applying them to a robot -- you simple click the command (or use the hotkeys) and then click the robot you want to apply it to.

Click To Play | Assembots - Robo-Lemmings

Click here to read more...

Click To Play | Why Am I Dead: Rebirth - 8-bit Murdered

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, Indie Games, PC games, Peltast Games, Why Am I Dead?

Click To Play | Why Am I Dead: Rebirth - 8-bit Murdered

Welcome back to Click To Play , the new-old regular series that takes a look at a new browser-based curio each week to further the fine art of procrastination. We accept absolutely no responsibility if you get caught at work/school/uni gloriously wasting time on the games listed here when you should be working.

This week: Why Am I Dead: Rebirth

The more I think about Murdered: Soul Suspect, the more it annoys the hell out me that such a grand opportunity for something truly special was ultimately squandered. If you're still a little annoyed at the wasted potential of Airtight's ghostly sleuth-em-up, then Why Am I Dead might be just the game for you.

Plus it's free, which is always a bonus.

Peltast Games' Why Am I Dead: Rebirth is a spruced-up version of a flash game from 2012 that saw you playing the spectral role of a murdered hotel manager. A storm is raging about the place, the game is afoot, but the police are nowhere to be found, no doubt delayed by the poor weather. It's up to you to investigate your own death.

Click To Play | Why Am I Dead: Rebirth - 8-bit Murdered

You can't touch anything, of course, or speak directly to the staff and the guests of the hotel, but you do have the ability to possess people and make your enquiries indirectly through the means of a surrogate. You float your ghost around the place using the [WASD] or [arrow] keys, tapping [space] or [Z] to possess anyone you come across. Once you've nabbed yourself a physical vessel, you can do things like open doors (for some reason this particular ghost can't pass through walls or doors) and talk to people. However, your guests and the members of staff to whom you talk will have different reactions and reveal different things depending on the person in front of them.

Click here to read more...

Click To Play: Phoenotopia - The Lovechild of Metroidvania and Classic Zelda

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, PC games, Phoenotopia, Quell

Click To Play: Phoenotopia - The Lovechild of Metroidvania and Classic Zelda

Welcome back to Click To Play , the new-old regular series that takes a look at a new browser-based curio each week to further the fine art of procrastination. We accept absolutely no responsibility if you get caught at work/school/uni gloriously wasting time on the games listed here when you should be working.

This week: Phoenotopia

This one's a little bit special, and it's about as good as free adventure/RPGs get.

Phoenotopia sees players step into the role of Gale, a pink-haired farm girl eking out an existence on a post-Earth colony. Life's is pretty good until a bunch of alien spaceships come and spirit away all of your neighbours, leaving just you and a rabble of pesky kids behind to fend for yourselves. As Gale, it's up to you to leave behind your home village, and to venture out into the world and discover what the hell happened to your friends and family.

Click To Play: Phoenotopia - The Lovechild of Metroidvania and Classic Zelda

As a game, Phoenotopia plays out like the lovechild of Zelda and Metroidvania's heyday, except it's free. But the price tag, or lack thereof, is in no way an indication of the quality of the game. Slap it on Steam for a handful of pounds and I'm pretty sure it could have done some serious business there. It's aesthetics are glorious. The visuals will appeal massively to SNES lovers, and the soundtrack is fantastic -- fantastical whimsy blended expertly with a dash of the rousingly epic.

Click here to read more...

Click To Play: Mr Splibox - Step On My Cubes

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, EyesTeam, Mr Splibox, PC games

Click To Play: Mr Splibox - Step On My Cubes

Welcome back to Click To Play , the new-old regular series that takes a look at a new browser-based curio each week to further the fine art of procrastination. We accept absolutely no responsibility if you get caught at work/school/uni gloriously wasting time on the games listed here when you should be working.

This week: Mr Splibox

Mr Splibox seems like an odd protagonist for a platforming game. He's apathy personified, a hero so lazy that he can't even be bothered to jump around. But he does have one special power that renders his lack of leaping something of a non-issue: he can spawn boxes out of his arse.

So it is that Mr Splibox navigates around increasingly complex levels, overcoming steps by building towers of cutesy cardboard boxes out of his bum, and crossing chasms by toppling said towers across previously impassable gaps.

Click To Play: Mr Splibox - Step On My Cubes

There are enemies to bypass as well. Moustachioed chumps will charge at you if they spot you, and it's therefore often necessary to get out of harm's way by crapping crates, leaving your 'tached foes to run off of ledges and sail into the odd abyss.

Click here to read more...

Click To Play: Schrödinghost - Thinking Outside of the Box

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Carduus, Click To Play, Indie Games, Ludum Dare 30, PC games, Puzzle games, Schrodinghost, Stealth Games

Click To Play: Schrödinghost - Thinking Outside of the Box

As we've shifted around a few things here on Dealspwn, we've freed up some time and space for a few of the regular features that we used to run. With that in mind, I'm pleased to announce that we'll be bringing back Click To Play on Mondays, delivering a new browser-based curio to further the fine art of procrastination.

This week: Schrödinghost

To usher in this new-old era of regular features, we're kicking things off with one of the highlights of Ludum Dare 30 (Connected Worlds) -- a point-and-click, stealthy puzzler named Schrödinghost, in which you play Schrödinger's cat, Maru. Maru is fed up of the experiments that have been flying about the place of late, and he's also pretty annoyed at being stuck in a box. If Schrödinger spies the box moving, Maru is dead, so the entirety of this short, sweet, silly little game is to basically avoid getting seen.

Click To Play: Schrödinghost - Thinking Outside of the Box

You have to avoid the circles of light that denote Schrödinger's field of vision, clicking to move and freezing before the scientist spots you, and attempt to make your way to the other side of each room. Sometimes you may have to distract Schrödinger, sometimes there'll be a leg of ham to snack upon. It's sort of part What's The Time Mister Wolf, and part Ghost Trick -- ah yes, you can also sort of astrally-project around the room you're in, using electric sockets to find hard-to-reach places, flicking light switches and radios and other devices on and off to better serve your purr-pose.

It's one of those games that you'll fail a lot as you puzzle your way through the various rooms and work out which bits are interactive, and which bits aren't. I kept accidentally over-clicking, and wandering into the faded, outermost circle of Schrödinger's FOV, whereupon he'd sort of cackle and I'd have to start the level again. But Schrödinghost is a game that's brimming with aesthetic charm, and music that you'll be hearing inside f your head long after you've stopped playing. The writing is fairly up and down, and sometimes the jokes are perhaps a little crass, but overall it's a charming little game.

There's even a Lonely Island reference in there.

Schrödinghost came joint-fifth in the Jam voting for LD30, and won top marks for graphics and sound, and it's easy to see why with its cracking concept and style.

David Brown's Free Play: Clouds, One Night Stands and Lovecraft

Author:
David Brown
Category:
Features
Tags:
1066 The Game, Browser games, Carrion Reanimating, Click To Play, Cloud Control, Download games, Free Play, Games articles, Musicminesweeper, Ute

FREEPLAY

Considering that one David Brown spent many an arduous month for PC Zone sifting through the interweb for elusive diamonds in the rough, we thought it'd be a crying shame if such talents were lost and so, here to replace Click to Play on Monday morning, Dealspwn are proud to present David Brown's Free Play. There'll be more games, more links, and many more options to help distract you from the working week. All work and no play and all that jazz...

Hundreds upon hundreds of freeware games appear on the market every month, it seems, and the vast majority are utterly forgettable. People have a romanticised view of these home-coded titles, deliberately ignoring glaring faults or stupefying dullness just because it's a bit kooky, a bit “out there”. After two solid years of having to scour the depths of the internet for diamonds in the rough, I've become relatively good at sorting the delicious sweetmeats from the rotten tomatoes. For that reason, Dealspwn have asked me to take a weekly rummage through the rubble, picking out treats and discarding garbage. We almost called it Free in a Bed. If you have any suggestions of your own as to what pun to use in a potential future title, do pop them in to  the usual address.

1066

First under the microscope is 1066: The Game which has been made in partnership with Channel 4, I believe. Old C4 have been quite generous with the cash recently, funding not only this but a whole raft of other projects, including the inestimable Privates. First thing I noticed was a reference to the Varangian Guard among the initial set of units you can select. I thought they were related to the Byzantine Empire exclusively, so it prompted me to do some research. You learn something new every day, it seems, which is clearly the whole point in this endeavour.

As a game, it's a semi-2D turn-based strategy with some little mini-games thrown in to try to simulate battle, the taunting of opponents and so on. You set up your army on a grid, with each turn giving you the opportunity to perform one action. You could fire arrows, move or taunt your opponent in an attempt to reduce their morale. Rout the enemy to win, basically, either by making their units all flee or making their morale so low they can't continue to fight. It's like Total War, but sideways. A bit. It's also quite confusing at first and the arrow firing is difficult for people who can't judge angles well, like me. It's definitely worth a quick glance at least though, even if just to stimulate your mind and get you learning about history. Don't be a weasel and just sit back taunting constantly though, it kind of defeats the point in playing.

Click here for more Free Play and see what else Dave has rustled up this week....

Click To Play: Epic Battle Fantasy 3

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, Epic Battle Fantasy 3, Role playing game, RPG Games

Clicktoplay

This week: Epic Battle Fantasy 3

The game is telling me to click in order to make boobs jiggle. No, this isn't a suspiciously erotic RPG that's bound to attract the attention of alley-lurkers and Fox News alike, but rather the new game from kupo707. Chock-full of juvenile humour and turn-based roleplaying actiongoodness, EBF3 is a game designed to make you chuckle whilst you go about your loot snatching and exhaustive levelling up.

epicbf3_2You'll know within half a minute of firing up the opening movie whetehr this is a game that'll appeal to your funny bone. Think Superbad, but a little more juvenile. If pre-pubescent boys could extract the zany thoughts from their brains and concoct games from their panting threads, this would probably be it.

To it's credit, though, EBF3 is a wonderfully solid, free RPG experience too. It boasts classic, mouse controlled, turn-based combat, loads of attacks and spells, weapons and potions, treasures and artefacts to locate and play around with. You won't get very far just by sticking with the 'might is right' mantra, though, as it quickly becomes apparent that checking out enemies' various weaknesses is the real way to divide and conquer in this particular title.

It looks beautiful, you can finally move around and it's clear that some serious developmental work has gone into this one. Moreover, there are an abundant number of skills and traits you can teach to your characters , tailoring the game to your own liking and style of play.

If you're looking for a game to sink a day or two into, but have developed a hole in your wallet after an awesome summer, this might just be the game for you. Expect to have to do a certain amount of grinding, though...and the occasional bout of kitten slaying.

I laughed...but then I still find whoopee cushions amusing.

Click To Play: Symon

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, Symon

Clicktoplay

Here at Dealspwn we're all about getting the best games for the least amount of financial effort, and we often tend to forget that some of the most addictive offerings out there are completely free. With that in mind, welcome to Click To Play, a new weekly feature where we'll be hunting down the best browser-based games each week so you don't have to.  Check in with us every Monday to spice up your coffee breaks for the week!

This week: Symon

Symon is a point and click adventure game from Gambit, running as part of a series of summer prototypes, in which you play a bed-ridden hospital patient whose only deliverance from the nightmare of his reality is through dreams. Cue an incredibly curious little game, if pretty short, that strives for something PnC games rarely achieve: replayability.

Sure you'll have to solve abstract puzzles thrown at you by the inhabitants of Symon's dreams as you might with any PnC game, a genre famed for boasting a certain logical progression, however warped that logic might be. But, thanks to procedural generation, you'll see a host of different things each time you play the game.

symon

Stuffed as it is with random items, things that really don't seem to make sense, half-symbols and paradoxical characters, Symon resembles something in and of a dream itself, which is kind of the point. Its haunting, bittersweet piano adds to an air of melancholy that pervades the whole thing, aided also by the stylised imagery that reminds me a little of a colour-version of Every Day The Same Dream.

Sadly, for all of  its interesting ideas and ambitious execution, Symon drops the ball in the last act, offering little closure to speak of. In between dreams you'll begin to see photos appear beside Symon's hospital bed as you 'solve' each dream, but once you've found all three there's little reason to carry on really. That said, while it lasts, Symon is a gently stirring, affecting demonstration of an ambitious take on the PnC genre.

Click To Play: One Button Arthur

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, One Button Arthur, Platform games

Clicktoplay

Here at Dealspwn we're all about getting the best games for the least amount of financial effort, and we often tend to forget that some of the most addictive offerings out there are completely free. With that in mind, welcome to Click To Play, a new weekly feature where we'll be hunting down the best browser-based games each week so you don't have to.  Check in with us every Monday to spice up your coffee breaks for the week!

This week:One Button Arthur

1clickarthurFrom the makers of One Button Bob comes another one-click platforming extravaganza. This time you're the heroic king of legend, tasked with leaping over lava pits, dodging ghosts in slaloming platform levels and skewering foes with your nameless understudy sword.

As with the previous adventure from Ninjadoodle, OBA is an exceptionally simple affair. Short and sweet, it's your job to guide King Arthur through a myriad of dangers to the fabled sword stuck in the stone and all you'll need is that trusty left mouse button.

One click does everything, based on the rules of each level. For instance, in one area it'll make Arthur jump, in another it might simply make him change direction or swing his sword or stop altogether. Each of the different areas are contextually different so you'll never have a 'jump' room followed by a 'switch' room. It's like someone took a load of themed WarioWare mini levels and strung them all together.

Understandably, ascertaining exactly what each area's click function is, and when and where to deploy it, revolves quite a bit around trial and error. But each of clicks are counted, the idea being that the fewer clicks you needed to finish the game, the better the score, with leaderboards spurring you to return to the relatively short platformer again and again.

I managed to get through it on a first playthrough with 448 clicks, eventually trimming it down to 379 after eleven runs. It'll only take about 5 minutes to go through the game, sound off in the comments with your scores.

Click To Play: Don't Go Zombie

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, Don't Go Zombie

Clicktoplay

Here at Dealspwn we’re all about getting the best games for the least amount of financial effort, and we often tend to forget that some of the most addictive offerings out there are completely free. With that in mind, welcome to Click To Play, a new weekly feature where we’ll be hunting down the best browser-based games each week so you don’t have to.  Check in with us every Monday to spice up your coffee breaks for the week!

This week: Don’t Go Zombie

Take away the frustration of planning your journey on Google Maps with this neat game. Because everything’s better with a dash of zombies right? Ok so it might be a little distracting to plan journeys with but it is cool how Google Maps is used in this zombie shooter.

Simply enter your postcode or anywhere else in the UK that has had a street view added to the Google Maps servers and you're away. The game chooses a random nearby destination for you to aim for by clicking forwards on the street-view picture to zoom forwards bit by bit and change direction with the navigation controls in the corner. Every now and then you will be attacked by some hand-drawn styled zombies that must be shot to progress.

Ok, you don't get a shotgun, as the game is sponsored by Virgin Trains (as a part of their ‘Don’t Go Zombie… Go Virgin Trains’ ad campaign) the zombies are actually tired travellers in need of a train. Your weapon is a sort of electronic ticket machine. Use your mouse to fire tickets. Body shots will stun them, slowing them down. You’ll need to land a head shot (slaps a ticket to their forehead) to cheer them up and send them off to their train.

Power-ups include rapid-fire and 'group bookings' to clear a whole screen of zombies for when you’re about to get mauled. Tension is added by your weapon having limited shots before needing to reload with the space bar.

When the zombies get too close they'll strike you leaving a glowing hand-print on the screen as your panic-levels start to rise. It's not very clear how much damage you can take before dying which is a bit annoying, especially when you're so close to your goal.

If you do get overrun you become a zombie too and can ask your friends via the Facebook linkup to help turn you back. You can start again too if you want. But hey you might as well do the Facebook thing even if it's just to get your own back by filling up your mates feeds with stuff as payback for all the relentless Farmville and Castle Age bollocks.

The gameplay might not change over time but you've no excuse for not having enough levels to play in. Be it around the UK's tourist spots or just your route to work or the shops. All in all, a fun distraction to whatever it is you’re supposed to be doing.

Click To Play: Choice of Romance

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Choice of Romance, Click To Play, e7

Clicktoplay

Here at Dealspwn we're all about getting the best games for the least amount of financial effort, and we often tend to forget that some of the most addictive offerings out there are completely free. With that in mind, welcome to Click To Play, a new weekly feature where we'll be hunting down the best browser-based games each week so you don't have to.  Check in with us every Monday to spice up your coffee breaks for the week!

This week: Choice of Romance

It's not often that you see a game that pitches a text-based 'choose your own adventure' situated in a fantastical historical version of Spain with Life and Death Magi, entirely focused on political intrigue and courtly romance. But Choice of Romance is one of those games. Produced by the same group who did our C2P featured Choice of Broadsides and Choice of the Dragon, it puts you in the shoes of the eldest child of a penniless feudal family looking to climb their way up the social ziggurat through your marital fortunes.

courtlyI'm a big fan of narrative in games and I used to absolutely love Choose Your Own Adventure stories when I was younger and I absolutely loved the first two games so this was something of a no-brainer.

It certainly won't be to everyone's tastes, although the Choice of Games team is gradually amassing quite a diverse roster - become a dragon, become and admiral, sleep your way to the throne (or not as the case may be) of a feudal nation - but I love them all. Again, there are multiple endings and narrative paths and, although often they're pretty predictable and sometimes the template is all too easy to see and the characters a little too neat, it's still a fun little way to spent a quarter of an hour.

Gay, lesbian, straight, bi-curious, this game's open enough to be accessible to anyone, a claim few games can make these days. But it's in playing out all of the different scenariosand exploring all of the endings that it'll really come to life. It's longer and deeper than the previous two, and apparently only the first part (the second is on the way). Hopefully there'll be some kind of way to continue on depending on what ending you arrived at, but we'll have to wait and see.

If that's not your bag...I suggest you check out fun little kinetic puzzler e7 which is another little game I've been utterly spellbound by since returning from Gamescom.

Click To Play: Solipskier

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, Solipskier

Clicktoplay

Here at Dealspwn we're all about getting the best games for the least amount of financial effort, and we often tend to forget that some of the most addictive offerings out there are completely free. With that in mind, welcome to Click To Play, a weekly feature where we'll be hunting down the best browser-based games each week so you don't have to.  Check in with us every Monday to spice up your coffee breaks for the week!

This week: Solipskier

This week it's time for you to grab a mouse and, with a click and a drag, create an undulating landscape that can serve as a skier's paradise. Why is he skiing? Why has the creation of the rest of the world been left up to you? Why does our winter sportsman fart rainbows when he scores points? These questions are never really answered, but one thing we do know is this: Solipskier is fantastically addictive.

As soon as you start drawing the landscape, the skier will begin his descent and it's up to you to guide him through high scoring hoops and tunnels, help him jump ravines and pull off death-defying stunts to keep his speed up. Do so and he'll leave a colourful rainbow in his wake and your score will start rising massively. Fail to keep the momentum up and he'll slow down, grudgingly pulling himself up hills before you get your rear in gear and have him swooping across your screen once more.

solipskier

Solipskier is something of a trial and error game. Get up to speed and the game begins throwing objects in your way, failing to deal with them results in a swift plummet and a fat Game Over headache for our daredevil. You probably crash and burn a fair bit in the first few attempts, but the game encourages perseverance with its speed blur and amphetamine-fuelled soundtrack and soon you'll be shouting at co-workers and colleagues to check out the amazing new trick you just pulled off...until you inevitably fai lto replicate it whilst everyone's watching. Still, there's always the next time eh?

Click To Play: Tower Of Heaven

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, Free, Platform games, Tower of Heaven

Clicktoplay

Here at Dealspwn we're all about getting the best games for the least amount of financial effort, and we often tend to forget that some of the most addictive offerings out there are completely free. With that in mind, welcome to Click To Play, a weekly feature where we'll be hunting down the best browser-based games each week so you don't have to.  Check in with us every Monday to spice up your coffee breaks for the week!

This week: Tower Of Heaven

This week we've got a bit of a throwback to the classic days of hard-as-nails retro platforming with a game that issues a simple challenge to the player - climb the tower - before throwing a bunch of rules and some injudicious mortal consequences into their face and mercilessly taunting them whenever they fail. Stop me if you've heard this one before...and you might well have done. Tower of Heaven actually came out last year as a downloadable title, but now Askiisoft have ported their taxing masterpiece into Flash so you can enjoy it in your coffee breaks too.

The aim is simple: climb to the top of the tower by busting through a number of mini levels within the time limit. You'll never need to worry about the time limit though, mainly because you'll die long before you run out of time. You see the invisible, yet strikingly vocal, owner of the tower in question isn't too happy about your antics and, in amongst all of the threatening spinning saws and spikes that jump out of the ground just before you land on the tile in question, he/she/it decides to come up with a whole bunch of rules that become more and more oppressive as you continue.

tower of heaven

First there are tiles that you can't land on. Then tiles you can't touch from the side. Then you'll find yourself desperately trying to time a jump over some spikes onto a platform that could dissolve you if not displaying the right colour, all the while attempting to dodge a butterfly that threatens to smite you with lightning if you touch it. You step back to the left, only to remember that one of the rules was you couldn't go back and so you're zapped into dust from the heavens.

It's a fiendish game, one that will have you in tears later on, but somehow it's all worth it if you can get to the stairs at the end of each level. It becomes a matter of personal pride, helped by the fact that the tower's host will take every opportunity to berate and insult you. The sounds and sights are perfect too, the game painted in the washed-out green/grey of the original Game Boy and sprinkled with music that walks the tightrope between insanely catchy and crazily irritating.

It's a brilliant little game...one that you'll grow to love almost as much as you hate.

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Click To Play: Pulsate

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, Music games, Pulsate

Clicktoplay

Here at Dealspwn we're all about getting the best games for the least amount of financial effort, and we often tend to forget that some of the most addictive offerings out there are completely free. With that in mind, welcome to Click To Play, a weekly feature where we'll be hunting down the best browser-based games each week so you don't have to.  Check in with us every Monday to spice up your coffee breaks for the week!

This week: Pulsate

pulsateSet aside your thoughts of pwning n00bs or defending your base against a pixellated horde of fiendish aggressive aliens, this is an utterly tranquil affair. Stumbled into work with a stonking hangover from a liver-busting weekend? Fear not, we have the perfect Zen remedy for you, courtesy of Andre Michelle's Pulsate, a nifty little webtoy that has you creating circles of sonic purity that emit ethereal notes when they touch.

Whilst my initial attempts turned into a cacophonous orchestra of badly played wine glasses, I was soon instigating ripples of musical wonderment that evoked atmospheric soundscapes of gorgeous serenity.

Click anywhere in the darkened area of play and you'll create a golden ring that will slowly begin to expand, instantly giving off a note and retracting as soon as it comes into contact with another. A little experimentation and you'll soon begin creating circles within circles, concocting your own symphony of ethereal delights at the touch of a mouse button. No, it's not the most conventional of C2Ps we've featured, but twenty minutes in and I'm still dicking around with the simple premise. It's just a shame you can't share your masterpieces with others.

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Click To Play: Zombies Took My Daughter

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Browser games, Click To Play, Zombies Took My Daughter

Clicktoplay

Here at Dealspwn we're all about getting the best games for the least amount of financial effort, and we often tend to forget that some of the most addictive offerings out there are completely free. With that in mind, welcome to Click To Play, a weekly feature where we'll be hunting down the best browser-based games each week so you don't have to.  Check in with us every Monday to spice up your coffee breaks for the week!

This week: Zombies Took My Daughter

The zombie craze didn't last nearly long enough if you ask me. Sure, vampires are capable thought and speech and apparently, if certain Mormon propaganda merchants and authors of carnal adventures in the Bayou are to be believed, peculiarly virile and vigorous activities of a sexual nature, but they're aslo sodding annoying and moody and shit. At least you know where you are with a good zombie and, quite frankly, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost wouldn't have been seen dead fending off vampires...in a manner of speaking.

zombies daughterRight...now I've got my little rant out of the way, we can turn our attention to a rather nifty little side-scrolling shooter from Nerdook called Zombies Took My Daughter. Delightfully high concept stuff, this 2D action spectacular sees you trotting throughout various zones in the city, kicking undead bottom and searching for your daughter Anna. The controls are simple - arrow keys to shuffle around, space bar to kill (or re-kill) things and the 'up' key to interact with doors and searchable areas like a cupboard or a corpse.

The cartoon gore factor is delightfully immature - these are zombies, limbs will fly - and the assortment of weapons ranges from the pleasing (auto shotguns and hatchets) to the bizarre (sheep-shearers). You're working against the clock too, with only 36 hours to spare before the last ship sails to leave you at the mercy of the mindless horde. Die and you'll respawn at the nearest subway station, but you'll have lost 2 hours which, considering NHS waiting times these days, is really not all that bad! It's all highly entertaining colourful fluff to keep you busy during your coffee breaks.

But this little game doesn't just stop there. Taking a leaf out of Left 4 Dead's manual for shambling reanimated corpse killing, Zombies Took My daughter boasts a city that's different each time. Each time you playthrough, ticking off areas one by one and rummaging around for clues, the layout will change, along with the flesh-eating inhabitants. It's nothing too stupendous or mind-blowing, but it's a neat little feature that works very well for a free game.

It's not perfect, the ending is a bit of a damp squib, but the in-game innovations are enough to keep you coming back every so often. It's not as compelling as it could be, but it's certainly a step in the right direction.

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