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Point and Click

Broken Sword 5 on PS4 only £13.95

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Deals
Tags:
Broken Sword 5: The Serpent's Curse, Point and Click, PS4 games

Broken Sword 5 on PS4 only £13.95

This deal is currently £3 cheaper than the next best deal for the brand new PS4 version of Broken Sword 5: The Serpent's Curse.

Puzzles and their bizarre solutions are just the right amount of complicated and satisfying to beat. While not bringing anything new to the genre, Broken Sword 5 is a fun point and click adventure -for both long-time fans and newcomers- with a compelling and mysterious religious conspiracy plot. Here's the link to my full review.

Thanks to comshoplesce.

Broken Sword 5: The Serpent's Curse Review

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Broken Sword 5: The Serpent's Curse, Point and Click, PS4 games, Xbox One Games

Broken Sword 5: The Serpent's Curse Review

It's seriously bad luck to be near George Stobbart. Just as his first Broken Sword adventure began with a death in Paris, someone is shot within minutes of Broken Sword 5. And so begins another adventure to find the murderer. There's more to it this time though as the shooter's main aim was to steal a mysterious (and quite disturbing) old painting from a Parisian gallery.

If you're new to the Broken Sword series, don't be put off by that daunting number in the title. This adventure works as a standalone title and instead of relying on series knowledge, merely gives the odd nod to fans via cameo appearances, and of course, irritable goats.

Broken Sword 5: The Serpent's Curse Review

Broken Sword is a point and click adventure series with a neat, classic cartoon visual style that has been updated slightly to stay true to the series' roots. This fifth title was developed through a successful Kickstarter campaign, and was originally released as a two parter for the PC and the Vita. Thankfully, we now to get to play it on PS4 and Xbox One too.

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Broken Sword 5 dated, priced and trailered for PS4 and XO

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
News
Tags:
Broken Sword 5: The Serpent's Curse, Point and Click, PS4 games, Xbox One Games

Broken Sword 5 dated, priced and trailered for PS4 and XO

We've been wondering when Broken Sword 5: The Serpent's Curse would be making it's way to PS4 and Xbox One and now we know the official date. We've even discovered a brand new trailer and handily, the new price.

The fifth game in the long-running point and click series will launch September 4th on PS4 and Xbox One, costing £19.99 ($29.99/€29.99). There will be digital and physical releases, with the latter including a printed comic book prelude. £19.99 is only the RRP though and we've already found a better deal on both formats, as you can see below:

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1954 Alcatraz Review | Prison Breakthrough?

Author:
Chris Hyde
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
1954: Alcatraz, Adventure Games, Daedalic Entertainment, PC games, Point and Click

1954 Alcatraz Review | Prison Breakthrough?

60 years is a long time, just ask my dad whose celebrating the milestone later this year. A lot can happen, and in fact a lot did happen since that post-war era with it's moody, atmospheric backdrop. There was also a very famous prison still in operation. And Daedalic Entertainment want to take us back there, to 1954, and, more importantly, back to Alcatraz. As such 1954 Alcatraz (a suitably named title I'm sure you'll agree) is their latest offering in their growing catalogue of Point & Click games.

You play as two protagonists throughout the game, the first of which is the imprisoned Joe, sent down initially for armed robbery, but a successful escape from his first prison landed him a spot in the world's most famous jail. Word's going around in Alcatraz that there's a plan to escape, and Joe wants in. But he's being monitored at all times, and Joe will soon come to realise that not only does every piece of info in Alcatraz have it's price, but also that not everyone on the inside is his friend.

Secondly you play as Christine, Joe's lover on the outside who is doing everything she can to help Joe in his escape attempt, whilst also dealing with the repercussions of Joe's armed robbery. She'll be dealing with the mob and the police in equal measure to keep everyone happy and more importantly far enough out of reach to discover what's really going on.

I won't bore you with the fundamentals of point and click gameplay, because with most games of the genre, they are the same. A combination of items here, using an item on a piece of scenery or person there - it's all fairly standard stuff. As with most Daedalic games, there is the option to have all interactive items/scenery appear at a press of the Space Bar. This speeds up your need to assess and trawl through each screen, but does obviously cheapen the game somewhat. Either way it's up to you, as the "Snoop Key" can be turned on or off in the options menu before starting or loading a game or during play.

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Broken Age: Act 1 Review | Unfinished Business

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Adventure Games, Broken Age, Double Fine, PC games, Point and Click

Broken Age: Act 1 Review | Unfinished Business

Platforms: PC

Developers: Double Fine

'Shut up and take my money!' That was the first thing I said when I learned that Tim Schafer and co. were making a new point-and-click adventure game. It didn't matter that they'd incorrectly assumed everyone thought that the genre was dead, it didn't really phase me when they announced that the game would be split into halves; after all, some of the finest of these extinct adventure games we've had in the last few years have been episodic in nature. It miffed me a bit when they decided that big name Hollywood talent was more important than getting the whole thing out on time, but to be fair, the voice acting in this thing is fantastic, so no complaints there really.

Put simply, there was a lot of excitement for Broken Age.

Broken Age: Act 1 Review | Unfinished Business

It is, in many ways, a delight. In one universe, Shay, brought to life with a marvellously understated performance from Mr. Wood, gets up for another day of routine aboard the spaceship Bossa Nova. He lives out his days in a childish paradise -- eating ice-cream, playing with train sets, and rescuing little knitted critters from staged peril before enjoying their hugs. The ship is a daycare prison, guarded by an overbearing AI (Jennifer Hale is fantastic) who addresses Shay as if he were her toddler son, and shields him from anything even remotely involving risk or danger. But adventure comes a-calling, and Shay learns the hard way that to be an adult is to make hard decisions, and that seeking danger has its consequences.

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Let's Play... Broken Age: Part 1

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Adventure Games, Broken Age, Double Fine, Double Fine Adventure, PC games, Point and Click, Videos

Let's Play... Broken Age: Part 1

It's here! The Double Fine Adventure is here!

Well... half of it anyway.

Remember all those times when someone would say, "Man, I'd pay good money to see Tim Schafer and co. do another point-and-click adventure game"? Well we did, and it's here, and it's stuffed with whimsy and charm and oddball humour.

But is it any good? Well, you'll have to wait a little while longer for our review, but in the meantime here's a little Let's Play video for the first half hour, with some bemused commentary from yours truly.

1954 Alcatraz Preview Playthrough | 30 Mins of Daedalic's Noir Adventure

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
1954: Alcatraz, Adventure Games, Daedalic Entertainment, PC games, Point and Click

1954 Alcatraz Preview Playthrough | 30 Mins of Daedalic's Noir Adventure

We've had our eye on 1954 Alcatraz for some time. The noir setting, the character mechanics that have you flit between the incarcerated Joe and his femme fatale wife Christine, the tantalising prospect of a branching narrative, all of it set to a bluesy, jazzy soundtrack and cel-shaded, expressive visuals.

Joe's been banged up for a heist that went south when the truck with all of the money in it blew up. But the gangsters to whom he owes a hefty sum think he still has it, hidden away somewhere outside of the prison, and are threatening Christine unless she pays up. Basically, as Joe tries to make his escape, Christine tries to find the money he hid before the gangsters make good on their threats.

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Broken Sword 5: The Serpent’s Curse – Part 1 Review | Last Tango In Paris

Author:
Chris Hyde
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Adventure Games, Kickstarter, PC games, Point and Click

Broken Sword 5: The Serpent’s Curse – Part 1 Review | Last Tango In Paris

Platforms: PC

Developer: Revolution Software

Publisher: Revolution Software

It’s very rare that my fiancée is more excited for a game than me. Normally it’s me explaining to her why you should pre-order, why a console needs to be had on launch day, and why that musical chest I got free with The Legend of Zelda: Link Between Worlds is so friggin’ awesome!

Ahem.

But for one franchise in particular she becomes just like me. The geek within rises, and she gets super excited. Step forward Broken Sword. Now luckily for me we’ve been waiting a long time since the last Broken Sword game – longer than our entire relationship in fact, so this is the first time I’ve bore witness to this excitement. I thought she got excited for Zelda, but Broken Sword is in another ballpark. Apparently this is a big deal – she funded it through kickstarter no less - so I’d better do it justice, or so help me that “big day” next year might never come.

Broken Sword 5: The Serpent’s Curse – Part 1 Review | Last Tango In Paris

No pressure then right? So, eyes down and concentrate.

For those not in as unique a relationship as mine, Broken Sword first hit the gaming scene way back in 1996. It focused on two individuals – local girl Nico Collard and American George Stobbart – who team up to solve a Parisian bombing, with many twists and turns along the way. The original game was your standard 2D point and click adventure, with sequels sending our heroes further afield to more varied locations, and adopting different gameplay mechanics – and even embracing 3D – with mixed success.

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Point & Click Adventure Sale (Inc. To The Moon, Richard & Alice) | 60% Off | GOG | PC

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Deals
Tags:
Adventure Games, Machinarium, PC games, Point and Click, Richard & Alice, The 7th Guest, To The Moon

Point & Click Adventure Sale (Inc. To The Moon, Richard & Alice) | 60% Off | GOG | PC

As dependable as the tides and the Autumn rain, GOG have launched another weekend sale, this time focusing on point & click adventure games. It's a neat mix of old and new, including the likes of The 7th Guest, To The Moon, Richard & Alice, Critter Chronicles and Machinarium.

If you want to see how the genre has evolved over the years, or just fancy combining some random objects together, be sure to check it out via the banner or link above. Or this one. We're all about convenience here.

Memoria Review | Back To The Good Old Days

Author:
Chris Hyde
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Aventure games, Daedalic Entertainment, Memoria, PC games, Point and Click

Memoria Review | Back To The Good Old Days

Platform: PC

Developer: Daedalic Entertainment

Publisher: Daedalic Entertainment

Point and click is perhaps the genre I remember most fondly growing up. Hours upon hours spent on games such as Day of the Tentacle and Monkey Island as a rabid kleptomaniac trying to work out what random combination of items the developers had conjured up this time to get past my current predicament. So it was with a wry smile that I powered up Memoria, a game in the Dark Eye series from Daedalic Entertainment, and a direct sequel to The Dark Eye: Chains of Satinav released in 2011. In Memoria, like its predecessor, you play as Geron, a bird catcher from Aventuria, in the kingdom of Andergast. Geron's fairy friend Nuri has been turned into a raven by a curse, and you are looking for a way to turn her back to her former self. Your search has led you into the forest to seek a mysterious mage called Fahi. Fahi offers to teach you a way to change Nuri back if you can solve the riddle he has been dreaming of. More specifically, he has been dreaming of a riddle encountered 450 years ago by a feisty princess known as Sadja. You then play out the role of Sadja and Geron, in vastly different times in Andergast, and you'll unravel more of the interlinking story, with plenty of twists and turns before it all comes together at the end.

Memoria Review | Back To The Good Old Days

So, a first notable difference to most point and click adventures is the notion of two protagonists. Now the first reaction - and certainly mine too when I saw a point and click game with multiple characters across differing timelines - was this would present plenty of cause and effect puzzles, similar to those found in the aforementioned Day of The Tentacle, but Memoria works slightly differently. A lot of Sadja's sections serve to flesh out a past that has already happened to her, educating both the player and Geron into this relevant past. This presents the player with plenty of diverse landscapes - and therefore puzzle opportunities - to explore, be it either in Sadja's adventurous past, or Geron's urgent and problematic present.

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Hands-On With Memoria | Daedalic's Fantasy Adventure Channels The Sierra Gems Of Yesteryear

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Adventure Games, Daedalic Entertainment, Games previews, Memoria, Point and Click

Hands-On With Memoria | Daedalic's Fantasy Adventure Channels The Sierra Gems Of Yesteryear

Platforms: PC

Developers: Daedalic Entertainment

Publishers: Daedalic Entertainment

Double Fine came under a bit of fire recently for the way in which they've handled the game formerly know as the Double Fine Adventure -- Broken Age. After all, instead of creating a game to spec gifted the generous $2 million budget by an eager, anticipatory community on Kickstarter, it seems that Tim Schafer and co. were more happy creating half a game with double the budget. Adventure games don't need astronomical budgets to be gripping, magical affairs. Nor has the appetite for them dimmed over the course of the years as some might tell you, it's more that other trends have risen and fallen in fashion.

Daedalic Entertainment have been producing retina-pleasing adventure games for years. Perhaps best known for their Deponia series -- a setting that rather left me cold, I'll admit -- I fell in love with their delightful tale of a would-be magician and a dimension-hopping bunny in Night of the Rabbit earlier this year, a sumptuous point-and-click affair that evoked the narrative spirits of Mssrs. Carroll, Lewis, and Milne.

Hands-On With Memoria | Daedalic's Fantasy Adventure Channels The Sierra Gems Of Yesteryear

But whereas The Night of the Rabbit was like flicking through an interactive children's book come to live, Memoria attempts to engage in the epic. Picking up from where Chains of Satinav left off, Memoria finds the hero of the last game, the bird catcher Geron, seeking to find a way to reverse the curse that has trapped the spirit of his friend Nuri in the body of a raven.  An encounter with a mysterious trader named Fahi leads to the possibility of salvation, but it comes at a price: Fahi demands the answer to a riddle involving a certain demon hunting princess, Sadja, who vanished 500 years ago in the midst of a war that shook the foundations of the world.

Click here to read more...

The Night of the Rabbit Review | A Delightful Daedlic Tale

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Adventure Games, Daedelic Entertainment, PC games, Point and Click, The Night of the Rabbit

The Night of the Rabbit Review | A Delightful Daedlic Tale

Platforms: PC

Developers: Daedelic Entertainment

Publishers: Daedelic Entertainment

There's something irresistible about The Night of the Rabbit to someone who grew up on a steady diet of the fantastical adventures peddled by the likes of Tolkien, Lewis, Carroll, Gaiman, and a certain A.A. Milne. Indeed, when I jumped into an hour and a half of The Night of the Rabbit a few weeks back, I expressed a certain delight at the whimsy and wonder to be found in Daedelic's latest adventure game. A few seemingly obtuse puzzles aside, I found that little snippet to have an abundance of warmth and imagination, and my main question afterwards was whether or not Daedelic could sustain that feeling across a full game.

Happily, the answer is a resounding yes.

Part of what makes The Night of the Rabbit so appealling comes in the simplicity of its opening. Jeremiah is a young boy, lamenting the fact that he only has a day or two of holiday left before its back to the contained monotony of school life. He dreams of becoming a magician, but he's a relatively poor apprentice, and the dream looks as if it will stay that way: just being a dream. Until, that is, he bumps into a dimension-hopping rabbit in a top hat, who just so happens to be a magician, can fix time so that Jerry isn't away that long, and proposes that the young lad realise his fantasy. It's wish fulfilment at its finest.

Of course, Daedelic have had occasional issues in the past with clunky scripting, voice acting that can be rather wooden and unsatisfying, and the odd irritating character. But I found little of that with The Night of the Rabbit

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Richard & Alice Review | When Hell Freezes Over

Author:
Chris Hyde
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Adventure Games, Denby Raze, PC games, Point and Click, Richard & Alice

Richard & Alice Review | When Hell Freezes Over

Platform: PC

Developer: Denby Raze

Available From: GOG.com / Desura / IndieCity

Price: £3.99

“So wait, hang on, I combine this toaster, and this piece of string, and I can make a helicopter? Brilliant!”

There’s something very unique about most point and click adventure games. In amongst the blatant kleptomania, is the almost Macgyver–like ability to create something out of nothing to progress the story forward. It’s what gives the genre its charm, and also provides its biggest frustrations, when tenuous item combinations are the only way forward on a sometimes illogical path towards the game's end. So when Denby Raze (made up of two gaming enthusiasts who've spent much of their time on this critical side of the fence - Lewis Denby and Ashton Raze) developed Richard & Alice - an indie point and click title that promises to provide puzzles and item combinations that make sense - I was tickled-pink with intrigue at how they would balance the obvious solutions but provide enough interest for the player.

Richard & Alice Review | When Hell Freezes Over

The game itself focuses on the two titular protagonists as they find themselves in an underground “prison” trapped in their own individual cells. A gander at the world outside the prison, and 'desolate' doesn’t do it justice. If you think the UK has had a lot of snow so far this year, you ain't seen nothing yet. Snow has ravaged the landscape for years in a manner that has led to widespread starvation, isolation and fear, with gangs forming to control what little supplies are available, and people gathering in safe zones to live together. Bleak? Well in a word, yes, and that sort of sets the tone for this adventure right from the off. This isn’t your usual charming, quirky and comic point and click adventure. The themes here are much darker from the get go, so you’d better be prepared for that as you dive in.

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The Testament of Sherlock Holmes Review | CSI 1898 Style

Author:
Brendan Griffiths
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
Focus Home Interactive, Frogwares, Point and Click, The Testament of Sherlock Holmes
Discuss:
PC | Playstation 3 | Xbox 360

The Testament of Sherlock Holmes Review | CSI 1898 Style

Platforms: PS3 (reviewed) | 360 | PC

Developer: Frogwares

Publisher: Focus Home Interactive / Ubisoft

The traditional point and click style adventure game is dead and buried as far as consoles are concerned, which makes Frogwares decision to bring this series to PS3 and Xbox 360 a brave one, but we’re certainly up for giving it a go.

Instead of the usual lever-pulling puzzles we’re used to, The Testament of Sherlock Holmes will require a bit more brainpower to proceed. Solving gruesome murder mysteries is the most enticing prospect and when you’re investigating a crime scene, the game really stands out. As with many of these games though, there tends to be a reliance on bizarre puzzles too. More on those later.

The Testament of Sherlock Holmes Review | CSI 1898 Style

The story is compelling throughout as you slowly unravel the mysteries behind the ghastly murders and the way you gradually begin to suspect Holmes’ motives is cleverly woven into the plot. Less clever are the trailers that preceded the game’s release that blow a considerable amount of the revelations. If you haven’t seen any already, avoid them at all costs. We could have done without the story using children rummaging through an attic full of Holmes’ possessions as a framing device too. It’s a pointless setup and annoys every time the ugly cutscenes pull back to them.

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Why We Love . . . George Stobbart

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Adventure Games, Broken Sword, George Stobbart, PC games, Point and Click, Why We Love

Why We Love . . . George Stobbart

The last few years have given rise to the stereotype that video game protagonists should be male, dark-haired thirtysomethings, with a hint of gravel to lend their voices gravitas, and the hint of some designer stubble to ensure gruff machismo...possibly voiced by Nolan North. But there was a time, back in the glorydays of the venture game, when heroes didn't have to be armed with chain blades, AKs, M4 rifles, dual silver ballers, or a massive scythe . In fact, they didn't have to be armed at all.

Long before the likes of Nathan Drake were delivering throwaway lines following the mass murder of several goons, there was a floppy-haired Yank with a frequently flippant sense of humour saving the world from Templars, Aztec deities, assorted gangsters and drug barons, armed with only a quick wit, an uncanny gift for hide-and-seek, and a seemingly unlimited supply of air miles.

That man is, of course, Broken Sword's George Stobbart.

One can't forget the unnaturally deep pockets too, nor his affinity for disguise. As much at home yanking out a manhole and heading into the sewers as masquerading as a doctor or a hilariously bad jongleur, Mr. Stobbart's best qualities are an undeniable sense of curiosity, and the tenacity of a bloodhound with a scent caught in his nostrils. He's a child of the Nineties - no Wella-styled hair for him, it's all about an early-Beckham mop on top. There are times when Stobbart channels the pithy asides of classic Hugh Grant, albeit without the quintessentially English bumbling.

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Runaway: A Twist Of Fate | £3.75 | Gamefly | PC

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Deals
Tags:
Adventure Games, PC games, Pendulo Studios, Point and Click
Runaway: A Twist Of Fate | £3.75 | Gamefly | PC

Gamefly are absolutely pummelling Impulse this week, undercutting their Focus Home Interactive deals at every turn. This one sees excellent adventure Runaway: A Twist Of Fate reduced to pocket money, though bear in mind that it helps to have played the first two games in the trilogy.

Game Buzz | Double Fine & Kickstarter: Can Crowd Funding Revolutionise Games Retail As We Know it?

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Adventure Games, Crowd Funding, Development, Double Fine, Kickstarter, Notch, Point and Click, Psychonauts 2, Publishers, Retail, Tim Schafer

Game Buzz | Double Fine & Kickstarter: Can Crowd Funding Revolutionise Games Retail As We Know it?

There have been some strange things happening this week, but I want to focus on just one: the Double Fine Kickstarter campaign, and in order to do that, we have to go all of the way back to an interview between Digital Spy's Matthew Reynolds and Double Fine's talismanic creative director, Tim Schafer.

"I mean I get a lot of, on Twitter or whatever, daily questions about Psychonauts 2," said Schafer. "And I would love to do Psychonauts 2, I've actually pitched that to publishers several times and no-one has taken the bait so far."

A Twitter Conversation And The Snowball Effect

The discussion surrounding the very possibility of Schafer revisiting old material was picked up by a number of media sites, ourselves included, and credit should certainly go to Reynolds for the little bit of excitable hubbub that was generated. Of course, it would never happen, we told ourselves; damn publishers! But then which publisher would be mad enough to go for a sequel to an admittedly astoundingly original game like Psychonauts that tanked on release? Schafer has always been something of a creative genius, but commercially-speaking he has been something of a risky venture for the last fifteen years. It wasn't wholly responsible, but the failure of Psychonauts played a big part in Majesco's retreat from big-budget games.

Game Buzz | Double Fine & Kickstarter: Can Crowd Funding Revolutionise Games Retail As We Know it?

The solution, of course, made after Brutal Legend more or less disappeared off of the face of the earth, was to split the studio into smaller internal teams, working on smaller titles with smaller budgets and more creative freedom.

And then Notch stepped in.

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'Machinarium' Dev Announces Next Title

Author:
Josh Clark
Category:
News
Tags:
Amanita Design, Botanicula, Indie, Machinarium, News, PC games, Point and Click

'Machinarium' Dev Announces Next Title

Amanita Design, the minds behind one of my all-time indie favourites Machinarium, yesterday announced their new title Botanicula.  Following the template their 2009 title so perfectly set out, Botanicula is set to be another eye-wateringly beautiful point-and-click adventure, this time centered around five saplings on a mission to save the last seed of the tree they call home.  All of this is evidenced in the trailer that accompanied the announcement, which you can check out below:

Instant beauty. Just add water...