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SNES

Are Nintendo giving up on SNES virtual console games?

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
News
Tags:
Nintendo, SNES, Wii U

Are Nintendo giving up on SNES virtual console games?

Nintendo have one of the most impressive legacy games libraries of any publisher or console manufacturer, but they're also astonishingly bad at letting us buy them. The Wii U virtual console is full of holes and if new reports from a third-party partner are accurate, they may have now completely lost interest in bringing new SNES games to Wii U to focus on other platforms.

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Blast From The Past | Captain America and the Avengers

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Captain America and the Avengers, Data East, Marvel, Retro, SEGA Mega Drive, SNES

Blast From The Past | Captain America and the Avengers

I've been meaning to do this one for a while, pretty much ever since the Avengers movie came out. But then something else happened, probably a new game, and I forgot about and wandered off to check out the new shiny thing. However, with Injustice out this week, it got me thinking about superhero games and some of my favourites, and I figured it would be a good time to bring up Captain America and the Avengers.

It's important to note that the game of which I speak is the side-scrolling beat 'em up that hit the arcades in 1991 before making a jump to the Mega Drive/Genesis in 1992, rather than the 1991 NES version of the same name. In the latter, the only two characters you could play as were Captain America and Hawkeye, as Iron Man and Vision had been kidnapped by the Mandarin.

Blast From The Past | Captain America and the Avengers

No, we're talking about the former: a game that managed somehow to release in the shadow of the vastly superior Streets of Rage and its sequel, dealt with Red Skull controlling the minds of a whole bunch of nefarious Marvel villains including Ultron, Klaw, the Living Laser, Whirlwind, the Mandarin, and Juggernaut, and let you play as any of the four characters to unload cans of whoop-ass on innumerable goons.

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Report: Homebrew SNES & NES Emulators On OUYA At Launch

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
News
Tags:
Emulator, NES, Ouya, SNES

Report: Homebrew SNES & NES Emulators On OUYA At Launch

The OUYA is designed to encourage homebrew development, and as we predicted, various emulators are already in the works for the cubic console.

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Blast From The Past | Super Bomberman + Super Multitap

Author:
Chris Hyde
Category:
Features
Tags:
Blast From The Past, Hudson Soft, Nintendo, Retro, SNES, Super Bomberman, Super Multitap

Blast From The Past | Super Bomberman + Super Multitap

With one of the marketable points of Nintendo’s WiiU system being it’s asymmetrical gaming that can include up to 5 players, it got me thinking about the first time console gaming allowed for up to 5 players at a time. It may come as a surprise to some of you younger ragamuffins but back in 1993, console gaming was very much a single or two player experience. It was you and a carefully selected friend (or in some infuriating cases, a family member) against the gaming world.

Blast From The Past | Super Bomberman + Super Multitap

So when the lovely people at Hudson Soft were developing a console sequel in their Bomberman series (the original Bomberman first released on the ZX Spectrum in 1983 under the pseudonym ‘Eric and the Floaters’), it was a good thing they were thinking outside the box. Their vision for Super Bomberman was to have up to 4 people involved in the multiplayer at one time. So along with the game, came a piece of kit that they also developed, call the Super Multitap – that would plug into Port 2 of your SNES and allow for a further 4 players to play, assuming you had enough controllers and the game supported it.

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60 Hz F-Zero Arriving On The Virtual Console

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
News
Tags:
F-Zero, Nintendo, NTSC vs. PAL, Retro, SNES, Virtual Console, Wii U games

60 Hz F-Zero Arriving On The Virtual Console

Nintendo released the futuristic SNES racing classic F-Zero onto the European Wii U Virtual Console today. However, instead of getting the slower 50 Hz version as before, we're the downnloadable version will be the 60 Hz NTSC version.

We PAL gamers are used to getting the short straw, but after complaints surrounding the 50 HZ EU release of Balloon Fight on the Virtual Console, Nintendo announced that the version of F-Zero on the Wii U eShop "is a release of the US-NTSC version of the game running at 60Hz."

For a limited time, it'll only cost you 30p too!

PWNCAST | Season 1: Episode 18 – Nostalgia Trip

Author:
Matt Gardner
Category:
Features
Tags:
Amiga, B'z, Doom, Dragon's Dogma, Game Boy, Into Free -Dangan-, N64, NES, Nostalgia, PC, Podcast, PWNCAST, Quake, Retro, SEGA Mega Drive, Sid Meier's Civilization, SNES, Wolfenstein, ZX Spectrum

PWNCAST | Season 1: Episode 18 – Nostalgia Trip

In this week's PWNCAST, at ODB's suggestion, we take a look back at the games and consoles that we loved when we were younger. We chat about the titles that got us into gaming in the first place, and take pride of place in our fond memories of days gone by and simpler times.

That's all after we talk about Dragon's Dogma, Carl waxes lyrical about his new PC rig and the latest MMO beta weekends, and we look at Nintendo's rather exciting post-E3 presentation.

PWNCAST | Season 1: Episode 18, Recorded: June 22nd, 2012

Music| B'z: Into Free -Dangan- (BUY IT HERE!!!)

Some of the things that get covered this week:

  • Dragon's Dogma
  • Why more awesome action RPGs need a kickass J-Rock soundtrack
  • Guild Wars 2/The Secret World beta weekends
  • Nintendo Direct: Namco Smash Bros., 3DS XL
  • Our first games
  • The halcyon days of the Spectrum and Amiga
  • Fondest early gaming memories
  • Our first FPS games
  • Favourite games of all time

...and much, much more.

This week in particular, we'd like you to get involved. Let us know what your favourite games of all time are, the games that had the biggest impact on you, and pop a nostalgic anecdote or two in the comments below.

We'll maybe even hand out a prize for our favourite.

Finally, do please keep writing in to [email protected] with requests, feedback, and topics you'd like to hear discussed. We've already had one or two (a tip of the cap to ODB for this week's topic), and we'd love to hear more.

Also, buy the Dragon's Dogma theme. Seriously.

Parental Advisory: We've tried to keep it as conversational and informal as possible, and you should be warned that there may be quite a few instances of strong language.

Click below to play the file, or right click on the banner at the top, and select 'Save Link As' to download the file onto your hard drive.

Want more? Check out the rest of our PWNCAST posts onsite, hit us up on iTunes, or subscribe to the PWNCAST Feed here.

PWNCAST | Season 1: Episode 18 – Nostalgia Trip PWNCAST | Season 1: Episode 18 – Nostalgia TripPWNCAST | Season 1: Episode 18 – Nostalgia TripPWNCAST | Season 1: Episode 18 – Nostalgia TripPWNCAST | Season 1: Episode 18 – Nostalgia Trip

When Was Gaming's Golden Age?

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Features
Tags:
Games articles, Golden Age, Mega Drive, Microsoft, Nintendo, PC, Sega, SNES, Sony

Get any group of veteran gamers together for a local multiplayer session and you'll witness the same argument. One will want to play a classic arcade game. Another will want to dig out the N64 for some Goldeneye deathmatch action. Yet another will dive straight for Modern Warfare. Videogames have spanned many different eras and iterations over the last 40 years... and yet it's difficult to pin down when it was at it was at its peak. When gaming truly enjoyed a Golden Age.

Let's try and sort out that age-old question once and for all. It's time for a look back at gaming's finest eras... and to decide which is the best.

Infancy & Arcades: The Stone Age

pong

A few grizzled veterans cling to the idea that the 1970s and eighties represent gaming's Golden Age... and there's no denying that these formative years were incredibly important. Bedroom coders and hobbyists bent primitive hardware to their will in order to make home computers good for more than just calculations. In 1972, a group of Stanford University students created a little company called Atari; championing the idea that videogames could be commercially played in public places. Pong, Space Invaders and Pac-Man became household names and birthed the first arcades... and increasingly powerful personal home computers such as the ZX Spectrum and Commodore 64 eventually came to the fore (along with new advances in technology and game design).

The seventies and early eighties were incredibly important for our medium, but they certainly weren't a Golden Age of videogames. Instead, they actually represent a stone age where pioneers banged together the crudest of tools to create primitive yet functional innovations. We salute these brave men and their dedication... but gaming was still very firmly in its infancy. We've come a long way, baby.

SNES, Mega Drive And The Rise Of The Console

mega drive

Co-opting personal home computers and designing custom arcade boards was the only way to game for a long while. However, Nintendo and SEGA were waiting in the wings to define what we've now come to know as home consoles. The Nintendo Entertainment System brought 8-bit gaming to the masses... but it was the 16-bit era that we need to concern ourselves with.

Click here to continue the quest for gaming's Golden Age...