Login | Signup

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Author:
Jonathan Lester
Category:
Reviews
Tags:
PC games, PS3 games, PS4 games, Sandbox games, Ubisoft Montreal, Ubisoft Reflections, Watch Dogs, Xbox 360 games

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Platforms: PC | PS3 | PS4 | Xbox 360 | Xbox One (reviewed)

Developer: Ubisoft MontrealUbisoft Reflections

Publisher: Ubisoft

Watch Dogs has its moments.

Interconnected future Chicago is a hacker's playground. You'll infiltrate heavily guarded compounds without even setting foot in the building, leaping between CCTV cameras like a digital ghost. You'll turn car chases into carnage as you detonate sub-street steam pipes and raise bridges, speeding away from pile-ups that would make Elwood Blues doff his fedora. Vindictive players will terrorise panicking criminals by remotely sending them threatening texts and arming their grenades, an unseen terror who eventually sneaks in to mop up stragglers with a baton and silenced pistol.

When its hacking, gunplay, stealth and driving come together, the result is pure water cooler magic.

Unfortunately these moments are wrapped in an open-world game that's arguably too big, flabby and formulaic for its own good, but they still make Watch Dogs well worth playing.

Criminal hacker Aiden Pearce finds himself on the wrong side of Chicago's secret digital oligarchy after a botched hotel heist, resulting in an equally botched hit that sees his niece killed and family fractured. His grief manifests in horrific fashion sense and a burning desire for revenge, returning to the city with smartphone in hand and extreme vigilante ultraviolence in mind. What follows is a good twelve-to-thirty hours of driving, shooting, hacking and open world shenanigans.

The story is solid and engrossing by open-world game standards, yet shies away from making much of a statement about anything in particular, more a grim personal revenge tragedy than a parable about the evils of surveillance. That's actually the way I like it, but it's a shame that the sweary narrative steadfastly refuses to have any fun beyond a couple of vaguely interesting characters, such as the flamboyant yet mentally unhinged fellow 'Fixer' Jordi Chin. He's fantastic, revelling in the freedom of a fully-hackable city in scene stealing style, and definitely should have been the main character.

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Aiden proves to be an underwhelming new frontman at first, uninteresting and po-faced to a fault while being too inconsistent to ever really sympathise with. This is a man who claims to be a vigilante yet automatically steals from every car he boosts, stops crimes yet doesn't return the stolen goods and actively works for criminal elements to earn literal beer money. Then breaks off his quest for justice by participating in drinking contests or silly augmented reality challenges; running down pedestrians en route even as cutscenes try to convince us that he's deep and edgy and cool and not at all a dense blob of game protagonist clichés that walks like a man, honest.

He'll grow on you. Eventually you'll make peace with the fact that Aiden is motivated by revenge, not absolute justice, which explains his inconsistent moral compass as little more than self-justification. Or you can just blame head trauma from one too many car crashes.

Luckily he's not the star of the show. Chicago is, or more accurately the wealth of ways in which you can digitally subvert the Windy City and its inhabitants with only the X button.

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Walking down the street lets you profile NPCs for pithy and smirk-worthy personal information, dip into their bank accounts and eavesdrop on their conversations, throwing up new objectives on the fly such as in-progress crimes or hidden dead drops. You can hack routers and peer into their homes a little like a virtual Rear Window, adding context and personality that's often lacking from open-world games. All mapped to X or Square. As the entire city is linked together by ctOS, it feels more connected and more alive than any number of sandbox games, or at least sells the illusion for long enough to get your money's worth.

As you'll doubtlessly know, however, Aiden's magical smartphone is capable of more than larceny and voyeurism. You can leap between any CCTV cameras in the vicinity, using your omniscient perspective to identify targets, scope out the and wreak havoc. Anything can be hacked so long as you have line of sight and subverted to devastating advantage. Power transformers turn into bombs that cut power to the whole block, steam pipes explode, solar panels become cover points to sneak between. Even enemies can be hacked into via battle dress cameras, distracting blackmail texts or even activating any carried explosives with devastating results.

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

The best story missions make full use of Aiden's abilities in a number of relatively open environments that let you mix stealth and hacking with solid Splinter Cell-inspired combat; packing weighty guns, click traversal and a fantastic cover system. You can use your abilities on the fly, pursuing criminals or mid-firefight, whereas many optional missions let you remotely cause havoc or hack into guarded server compounds by creatively hopping between different cameras - without even setting foot on the premises or harming anyone at all. Whether Aiden becomes a stealthy digital ghost or a vengeful poltergeist is entirely up to you. It's empowering, hilarious and absolutely bloody wonderful.

Unfortunately the gunplay often overshadows the hacking aspect, since firearms are far too easy to get hold of. When you can buy a grenade launcher over the counter (which is legal in present-day Chicago, by the way, you just can't purchase the ammo), it's all too tempting to just launch a grenade rather than cleverly hack your way to victory. Worse, you'll get more XP for shooting people in the head than creatively and bloodlessly completing objectives. It's one of several ways Watch Dogs encourages behaviour that's at odds with its mission statement, joined by a sickening embarrassment of instant-fail stealth and/or tailing objectives that restrict freedom, not promote it.

"Hacking is your weapon." No, Ubisoft, "grenade launcher is my weapon." Be sure to impose self-discipline to enjoy Watch Dogs' innovative elements to the full.

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Steam Pipe is MY weapon.

Aiden can't shoot while driving, however. We like this immensely, because Watch Dogs makes perfect sense when you're behind the wheel. Once you've mastered the slippery arcade handling (Pro Tip: neither accelerate nor break while steering), you'll hurtle through the streets pursuing terrified mobsters or hounded by police (sometimes both), sliding and screaming around corners, through parking structures and across train tracks. Chicago seems to have been designed for cars rather than humans, boasting numerous routeways, shortcuts, jumps and destructible barriers.

GTA this ain't - everything is exaggerated and generous to a satisfying degree, with even pathetic little people-movers becoming ruinous tanks when Aiden leaps into the driver's seat. A simple matter of hacking  into any parked car with no fuss or ordering a delivery from Jordi that arrives within seconds.

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Add hacking and you've got a recipe for fun, fun, fun. Who needs a gun when you can raise bollards directly in front of police cruisers, resulting in a slow-motion multiple car pileup? Never mind grenades, why not take down your fleeing quarry by switching every traffic light to green, crushing them to death at the next intersection, or detonate subterranean steam pipes directly beneath them? Why drive on the ground when you can raise any bridge you want and fly? Ubisoft are clearly Blues Brothers fans as we're free to re-enact the best car chases in their entirety any time we want, and even set up a custom blues soundtrack too. Though admittedly I also have a little Alice Cooper and Smashing Pumpkins on mine for flavour.

So Watch Dogs has all the gameplay elements it originally promised: hacking, stealth, driving and shooting tied together with a slow-motion focus mechanic that gives you the time you need. It should be great -- it is great -- but unfortunately it isn't perfect. Not by a long shot.

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

If the gameplay lives up to expectations, the graphics don't. Watch Dogs is still a handsome game, boasting sumptuously fluid animations and gorgeous night-time vistas, but the fidelity and crispness just isn't anywhere near the levels we were previously shown (especially in screenshots). Frame rate can occasionally suffer on Xbox One, too, while the physics definitely aren't worth writing home about. Stylish and genuinely pretty in parts, especially the sunshine after a heavy rainstorm that picks out pools of surface water, but no next-gen benchmark.

The AI also seems to have taken a hit since I last saw it. Pedestrians often won't leave their car when you crash into them yet leap for cover when you vaguely drive somewhere near them, a far cry from the 'stim'-powered emotions model I was shown in the production build. Hardened criminals will blithely ignore hordes of pedestrians saying "are you feeling alright, buddy?" as they walk past Aiden crouching behind a wall in broad daylight. The police are also somewhat quirky, balancing their complete lack of water vehicles (hence you can escape by river with ease) by blasting out nonsensical scanning circles that can detect Aiden even if he's behind several walls or in a different car. Seriously, does Chicago PD put a crystal ball in every cop cruiser?

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Watch Dogs' biggest problem, ultimately, is its ridiculous amount of padding. We're all about open-world offering value for money, but Ubisoft were clearly desperate to cram their game full of recycled "content" without thinking about whether it fits the setting or character.

Hacking into a regional ctOS control tower in an environmental camera puzzle makes sense, but randomly racing around between arbitrary checkpoints for criminals does not. Pursuing rival fixers may be a thrill, especially during online invasions that suddenly throws a rival player into your session for tense cat & mouse minigames, but finding dozens and dozens and dozens of 'investigation' missions boils down to standard open-world bumf we've played dozens of times before. Hacking into gang hideouts is fun, but QR code challenges are just rehashed Mayan Stelae from Assassin's Creed IV.

More to the point, Aiden is not the kind of guy who'd put his thirst for vengeance on hold to participate in drinking competitions or run around playing idiotic AR games in public places, exposing his face and leaving himself vulnerable! It's ridiculous, despite the virtual spider tank minigame admittedly being rather fun.

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Online invasions are brilliant, though like the optional missions, most of Watch Dogs' multiplayer modes are redundant

Put simply: Watch Dogs is fat. Dangerously, morbidly obese. It's twice the size that it needs to be, stuffed full of optional junk food that tastes the same as everything we've tried before and waters down the original premise. Every nonsensical street race or AR challenge makes Watch Dogs feel just a little bit more generic, more like a GTA or Saints Row clone than its own unique entity. Ubisoft should have trimmed Watch Dogs down, made it muscular and powerful, not overfeed it like Mister Creosote. Just one wafer-thin street race?

But ultimately it's optional content. Stuff you can skip if you want to, but dabble into if you have the time. Personally you'll find me listening to classic blues and hooning a cop cruiser over raised swing bridges, watching a throng of police cars flipping out of control in slow motion. Just because I can. After agonising over the score for several days, I feel that the Watch Dogs slots perfectly into our rating criteria.

Pros:

  • Hacking and camera-snooping is revolutionary and relevant
  • Rock-solid shooting and stealth
  • Drift-heavy driving lets you cause havoc with power slides and city hacks
  • Compelling storyline (at least by open-world standards)
  • Some great missions and surprisingly enjoyable online invasions
  • Enormous; countless opportunities to make your own fun

Cons:

  • Overly grim and gritty; Aiden is a complete tool
  • Guns, grenade launchers and unbalanced XP rewards can overshadow creative hacking
  • Too many instant-fail missions
  • Shockingly padded and flabby; deeply inconsistent optional mission design

The Short Version: Watch Dogs is a revolutionary sandbox that redefines player freedom and choice... that was subsequently eaten by a big bloated open-world game that takes less risks than it should.

Watch Dogs 2 will need to focus and turn fat into muscle, but the fact remains that Ubisoft have delivered a huge versatile game that can be enjoyed on your terms. Combat, stealth and driving are all strong enough to impress, while hacking constantly provides new opportunities for violence, evasion, chaos, mischief or plain old voyeurism. You can still see the fiercely unique hacking game just behind the bloat, and better yet, play it.

Watch Dogs Review | Big Dog

Add a comment20 comments
Zeipher  Jun. 3, 2014 at 12:20

Booo!

Hate this game! Mission restarts and checkpoints are a disaster.

One boss fight has you sit around for about a minute before 3 people appear. 3 headshots later, you have to sit around for another minute before he finally appears with a tank character that can survive 5 explosions. Stupid. I died so many times, I nearly gave up on the game entirely. In the end I only won because the boss somehow shot his partner, and I got a sneaky headshot in.

In addition, the drift heavy controls are a disaster. I can't see a difference between braking my car and hand braking. I seemingly can't drift when I want, and the fact that I slide all over the place while driving means I've killed so many civilians by mistake, causing my reputation to constantly need fixing.

The enemies in the levels are also randomly generated, which means if you fail, you can't learn from your mistakes. Sometimes enemy 1 will be carrying a grenade for you to detonate... sometimes they can be distracted by a text message. This means that you can't improve bit by bit. Also, the fact that you really should scan the entire complex each time you start a mission gets boring fast.
Glitches also suck the fun out of it. I've had a convoy recognize me as the bad guy from over half a kilometre away, behind 3 buildings. Enemies know that you're their enemy, even though normal civilians are also wandering around, I've gotten stuck in the terrain on 3 separate occasions...

I know hate is a strong word, but it's extremely rare that I actually throw my controller or scream at my TV. This game just brings out the worst in me.

Last edited by Zeipher, Jun. 3, 2014 at 12:37
JonLester  Jun. 3, 2014 at 12:37

@Zeipher: There are certainly too many instafail objectives and failure conditions, which I called out, but I'd posit that they're so annoying because so much of the rest of the game gives you the/more freedom to complete objectives in your own particular idiom.

The score flopped between a 7 and an 8 throughout the last few days - part of the reason it took so long. But I personally decided to give Watch Dogs the benefit of the doubt - was able to ease the sting of the occasional annoying failed mission by making my own fun in spades. Chasing a boat on a bike sticks in my mind as being ridiculously annoying, but then it opened up into an open area that let me jump by bike into the sea, sneak into an installation and then snipe all the survivors just for fun.

EDIT: "The enemies in the levels are also randomly generated, which means if you fail, you can't learn from your mistakes. Sometimes enemy 1 will be carrying a grenade for you to detonate... sometimes they can be distracted by a text message. This means that you can't improve bit by bit. Also, the fact that you really should scan the entire complex each time you start a mission gets boring fast."

I actually really like the randomisation factor and argue that it's an essential part of the game. Hacking is effortless and it forces you to think on your feet, improvising instead of iterating. If enemies weren't randomised then *all* missions would be memory tests, not sandboxes.

Last edited by JonLester, Jun. 3, 2014 at 12:58
stevenjameshyde  Jun. 3, 2014 at 12:47

The comments about the driving concern me. It's made by some of the same people who did Driver San Francisco, which was flawless in that department - what went wrong?

I'll pick it up in the week-long sweet spot after all the bugs have been patched and before the online community dies

Late  Jun. 3, 2014 at 13:04

Shame. It had so much promise, and I was keen to get this either at launch or soon thereafter, but now I'm inclined to wait until it's around half price.

For a game that's supposed to be all about hacking, it's pretty unforgivable that you'll usually score better if you eschew your skills and equipment in favour of guns and grenades :(

Zeipher  Jun. 3, 2014 at 13:16

I actually really like the randomisation factor and argue that it's an essential part of the game. Hacking is effortless and it forces you to think on your feet, improvising instead of iterating. If enemies weren't randomised then *all* missions would be memory tests, not sandboxes.


You make a valid point, but seeing as I can't save whenever I want, I get annoyed with having to restart some missions from scratch just because I was seen by the very last guy.

I think to myself "Ok, that approach worked, let's try that again, but this time not mess up on that last guard". Suddenly, everything's changed, and I find myself messing up at a different point because the guard that had the text distraction before suddenly had a grenade blow up. I find it turns into a game more about luck at times.

*SPOILER?* The one mission I thought was stupid involved me chasing down a van while the entire police force was after me. After a 2 minute pursuit and being chased from all angles, I finally caused the enemy to crash, jumped out my car, threw a grenade at him, got back in my car and continued to drive. After another couple minutes, made it to a dock, smashed through a barricade, jumped into a boat and started to escape. The police helicopter simply hovered above me and started shooting me. So I let go of the wheel, and tried to hack it so I could escape. The thing is, Aiden has a real dislike of being able to look directly above him, meaning I couldn't hack the helicopter... meaning I was slowly shot to death.

So, after what ended up being quite an exciting 5 minute chase, I had to restart it from the beginning because of one limitation. I finally managed to escape by jumping on a train, and letting the time run out. Very boring, but it worked.

Last edited by Zeipher, Jun. 3, 2014 at 13:23
JonLester  Jun. 3, 2014 at 13:22

@Late: You can get good XP by using your hacking skills to creatively murder everyone, in fairness. Takes longer but is much more satisfying too.

RE Driving: This is a massive bone of contention - no three people can agree on whether it's fit for task or appalling. Personally I don't have a problem with it - it's slippery but offers decent control when you slide around corners - but those who play driving games regularly will likely hate it.

Horses for courses, really. I can't tell you to love it and would love to get some more perspectives on this!

@Zeipher: "The one mission I thought was stupid involved me chasing down a van while the entire police force was after me. After a 2 minute pursuit and being chased from all angles, I finally caused the enemy to crash, jumped out my car, threw a grenade at him, got back in my car and continued to drive. After another couple minutes, made it to a dock, smashed through a barricade, jumped into a boat and started to escape. "

Here's the thing: that's an awesome water cooler story, another totally unique anecdote that Watch Dogs gave you the freedom to create. It may not have the best ending, but you improvised a crazy war story out of Watch Dogs' mechanics that's unique to you. The fact that we've all got stories like this is what eventually made me round up.

Agreed about the annoying 'looking up' restriction, though. I strongly suspect Ubisoft limited our viewing angle to balance some of the camera/lift puzzles.

Last edited by JonLester, Jun. 3, 2014 at 13:41
Zeipher  Jun. 3, 2014 at 14:00

Here's the thing: that's an awesome water cooler story, another totally unique anecdote that Watch Dogs gave you the freedom to create. It may not have the best ending, but you improvised a crazy war story out of Watch Dogs' mechanics that's unique to you. The fact that we've all got stories like this is what eventually made me round up.


The thing is, I could do exactly what I ended up doing in this game that I could in GTA. The difference being that I could have shot out the tires of the van I was chasing, instead of hanging on for dear life up until the van got close to a steam pipe. With the police in close proximity, I couldn't accurately target any other "accident" with my target. I guess if you were watching me do all that, it might be pretty exciting... But playing it...? That was probably on my 3rd attempt, and it took me 2 more attempts before I made it out. By that point I was just bored and frustrated.

My character should be able to choose whether he uses his phone while driving or his guns. It's annoying when I'm driving as fast as I can, and the enemy easily pulls up alongside me, rolls down his windows and starts shooting the hell out of me. Meanwhile, as I'm slipping and sliding all over the (unbelievably oil slicked) road, I'm causing traffic accidents which don't affect him because he's glued to the side of me.

I've got watercooler stories about quite a few awful games, too... but I wouldn't give them a higher rating purely due to that reason.

While I'm playing WatchDogs, I keep thinking to myself "This is a poor man's GTA". The thing is, I'm not a big fan of GTA either, but I'd even pick GTA4 over this mess. If you want to play a fun open world game, I'd recommend Sleeping Dogs over WatchDogs every day of the week.

Agreed about the annoying 'looking up' restriction, though. I strongly suspect Ubisoft limited our viewing angle to balance some of the camera/lift puzzles.


Would make sense if I was using a camera, as it's stuck to a wall... but this was the guy's head. If they're going to have this bizarre restriction, they should program the helicopter to hover at a viewable angle from you. Unfortunately it wasn't the first time it had happened either.

The kicker was, after I finally did escape, I only got 270xp.

JonLester  Jun. 3, 2014 at 15:22

@Zeipher: Fair enough! Though I'd quibble with some of the points you made, your opinion is every bit as valid as mine and will be very helpful for other readers as a different perspective. I'm definitely not trying to somehow convince you to love a game you hate for well-explained reasons. ;)

Last edited by JonLester, Jun. 3, 2014 at 15:37
Breadster  Jun. 3, 2014 at 15:23

And there goes my huge post again, I don't know why I bother.

The review is pretty spot on and @Late - don't worry about there being a focus on shooting, there isn't. I barely ever feel the need to use my guns, it's way more fun sneaking around and manipulating the environment to your advantage.

Late  Jun. 3, 2014 at 15:37

Thanks Jon & Breadster. I'm feeling a lot more faith in the game now - though I'll still wait a while for it to drop in price.

Zeipher  Jun. 3, 2014 at 18:15

@Zeipher: Fair enough! Though I'd quibble with some of the points you made, your opinion is every bit as valid as mine and will be very helpful for other readers as a different perspective. I'm definitely not trying to somehow convince you to love a game you hate for well-explained reasons. ;)


Aww! Come on, Jon! Quibble! It makes for a great discussion! A mate of mine thinks it's the best game they've played in a long time, and is already in their list of favourites, and with an average 8 across the reviews, I know I'm in the minority. I'm not saying my opinion is the only one that's valid, but a heated, but friendly discussion is always enjoyable.

Which points would you disagree with?

Zeipher  Jun. 3, 2014 at 18:25

And there goes my huge post again, I don't know why I bother.

The review is pretty spot on and @Late - don't worry about there being a focus on shooting, there isn't. I barely ever feel the need to use my guns, it's way more fun sneaking around and manipulating the environment to your advantage.


I believe the point was that if you're looking to 'level up' faster, you can do so by shooting people in the head rather than leading them somewhere secluded, sneaking up on them and knocking them out.

But despite the weapons/shooting mechanics being great, it is a LOT more fun to sneak in, and take out a room without anybody realising. As you get more used to the mechanics, you can actually hack into an entire building and take the data without anyone realising you were ever there, without even stepping foot on the premises.

These points are good... but maybe I'm impatient, as for me that gets quite boring. I prefer to cause a bit of chaos every now and then.

The side missions I hate are those in which you can kill every single one of a gang leaders men, but you must NOT kill the gang leader. Doesn't make sense to me. One time I took everyone down, and the leader suddenly jumped in a car and drove away, resulting in a failed mission.

I really dislike falling at the last hurdle, and this game has that happen way too many times.

Last edited by Zeipher, Jun. 3, 2014 at 18:27
Ilium  Jun. 3, 2014 at 22:12

If there was a prize for a game that most squanders its outstanding potential, this would be it. Not been this disappointed by the first few hours of a game since Final Fantasy XIII.

Breadster  Jun. 4, 2014 at 07:21

The side missions I hate are those in which you can kill every single one of a gang leaders men, but you must NOT kill the gang leader. Doesn't make sense to me. One time I took everyone down, and the leader suddenly jumped in a car and drove away, resulting in a failed mission.

I really dislike falling at the last hurdle, and this game has that happen way too many times.


I always try and do them stealthily, using takedowns on everyone so it's never bothered me, but I agree that it's a little odd.

The only missions that have annoyed me are the "instant fail when you're spotted" ones, incredibly tedious.

I've even enjoyed getting the collectibles which has virtually never been the case in any other game. Finding the right angle for the QR codes, following the data trails to hack into buildings, etc. It just makes it more interesting than picking up hidden items.

Last edited by Breadster, Jun. 4, 2014 at 07:21
Tsung  Jun. 4, 2014 at 08:07

Excellent review and discussions, I love it when games get this sort of reaction. After holding off for a week I bought it today for the PC for a mere £21.75. This includes the 4 "Preorder?" DLC's so an utter bargain it's U-Play code(s).

http://www.cdkeys.com/pc/games/watch-dogs-pc-cd-key-uplay

(Like them on facebook to get an extra 5% off as normal). :D

Last edited by Tsung, Jun. 4, 2014 at 08:07
JFlex  Jun. 4, 2014 at 14:23

Zeipher I couldn't agree more with your points. They are absolutely spot on. Getting "watercooler stories" is not a reason to give praise to the game as the reviewer did. Every game good or bad will generate a story for you to share, whether it's something awesome that happened or something wretchedly irritating. Watch Dogs is absolutely a poor man's GTA and I too was not a fan of the GTA series. The failing at the last hurdle is a reason I gave up on the side missions. The frustration wasn't worth the eventual completed mission. Over all I felt that Watch Dogs promised so much but in the end, lacked on the delivery.

Breadster  Jun. 4, 2014 at 14:53

I really don't see why people compare it to GTA, it's not the same kind of game. GTA is about over the top action, mocking modern society and just generally being outrageous. Watch Dogs is essentially a stealth game that lets you manipulate your environment which makes a lot of scenarios feel almost puzzle like.

It's probably closer to Assassin's Creed than GTA imo, but I guess maybe it depends on how you choose to play the game. They probably should have just made guns really rare in it to focus more on the stealth gameplay and stop people thinking "woohoo, next gen GTA!" and getting disappointed when they see that that's not what it is.

I think the main problem is a lot of people were super hyped for this game, expecting it to be the best game ever or something. I just thought it looked pretty cool and mostly got it so I had a new game to play on my PS4, and I really enjoyed it.

Zeipher  Jun. 4, 2014 at 16:32

I really don't see why people compare it to GTA, it's not the same kind of game.


I disagree with that statement.

• Open World
• Steal Cars
• Gunfights
• Kill people (including civilians)
• Fight gangs
• Police chases
• You play as a criminal

The ONLY real difference with WatchDogs is that you have a hacking mechanic, which allows you to play stealthily. I'd say it's a cross between GTA and Splinter Cell (which is by nature a stealth game)... but it barely even scratches how stealthy that game is. I'd agree with the stealth aspect a little more if the main character had the simple ability to move next to a door and slowly open it rather than walk on in and hope for the best. What an odd feature not to include!

Sure, there's a morality element involved, but that's broken. You don't get penalised for stealing from normal people (even poor people diagnosed with cancer). I was rammed by a police car, forcing me into a bus stop, killing 3 people. That wasn't my fault directly. Who the hell rams people in a crowded area? They're just overly aggressive. They should wait until you're in an open area, or causing a lot of damage. Someone reports a car jacking, and the police decide the best cause of action is to completely total the car in order to return it??? Can the police even arrest you in this game? Or do they only shoot to kill. Hell, I was killed by the police because I was chasing a random man who shot someone in the street, and then started to shoot me! No gun out, just overly aggressive police officers.

HOWEVER, if I cause a massive car crash by disabling the lights, 4/5 times, one of the cars will catch on fire. The driver will slowly get out, and then stand by their car waving their arms around until the car blows up and kills them. For this, I don't get any penalty to my morality, even though I was the direct cause of their death, and it was a lot more intentional than being pushed into a bus stop.

Zeipher  Jun. 4, 2014 at 16:38

The failing at the last hurdle is a reason I gave up on the side missions. The frustration wasn't worth the eventual completed mission.


I also gave up on the side missions. On one mission, I had to stop a convoy of 5 cars, but not kill 2 people (just knock them out). The game would spawn me in the middle of a park each time I died or failed, a good run away from any transport; and with people seemingly enjoying standing next to burning cars that like to explode, I failed a lot.

JFlex  Jun. 5, 2014 at 15:04

The failing at the last hurdle is a reason I gave up on the side missions. The frustration wasn't worth the eventual completed mission.


I also gave up on the side missions. On one mission, I had to stop a convoy of 5 cars, but not kill 2 people (just knock them out). The game would spawn me in the middle of a park each time I died or failed, a good run away from any transport; and with people seemingly enjoying standing next to burning cars that like to explode, I failed a lot.


I too had my fair share of fails as well. There were plenty of times I put down the controller and said, "I'm gonna go read a book".

Trackbacks

http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-pc-code-2175-cdkeys-uplay-174985http://www.dealspwn.com/glance-roundup-1st-8th-june-2014-175188http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-1595-pc-cd-keys-176210http://www.dealspwn.com/ufc-uk-games-charts-176244http://www.dealspwn.com/sniper-elite-3-assassinates-ufc-uk-games-charts-176758http://www.dealspwn.com/direct-hit-sniper-elite-3-uk-games-charts-177259http://www.dealspwn.com/time-top-ten-games-2014-177317http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-sells-8-million-copies-top-dog-uk-games-charts-177786http://www.dealspwn.com/ps4-watch-dogs-tlou-remastered-385-tesco-178779http://www.dealspwn.com/sales-178785http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-2499-ps4-grainger-games-180986http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-special-edition-2399-ps4-xbox-game-183807http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-ps4xo-2399-183879http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-special-edition-ps4-game-184789http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-ps4-xbox-1499-grainger-games-186164http://www.dealspwn.com/game-offering-watch-dogs-special-edition-15-preowned-186481http://www.dealspwn.com/game-year-awards-2014-action-game-190280http://www.dealspwn.com/game-year-awards-2014-ip-190356http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-special-edition-1995-wii-2-192039http://www.dealspwn.com/stock-watch-dogs-special-edition-1699-wii-192459http://www.dealspwn.com/woof-watch-dogs-special-edition-949-pc-192832http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-deserves-shot-1299-xbox-195615http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-12-ps4-197391http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-cheap-pc-deal-199192http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-999-ps4-199836http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-999-ps4-xbox-202789http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-1450-ps4-999-preowned-206620http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-bargain-999-ps4xo-208332http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-1257-ps4-208512http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-bargain-799-ps4-209651http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-assassins-creed-unity-double-pack-2499-210163http://www.dealspwn.com/playstation-4-console-watch-dogs-bundle-26973-212928http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-survives-hype-799-ps4-999-xo-216853http://www.dealspwn.com/watch-dogs-1-spend-10-preowned-titles-game-223612http://www.dealspwn.com/ps4-1tb-3-games-300-bundle-227059

Leave a Trackback from your own site

Email Address:

You don't need an account to comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.